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Kerrville Tri – New July Playlist

The days are getting longer and it is about time for a playlist refresh. We put together 1.5 hours of jammin’ tunes to keep you motivated while you move. Play from start to finish or pick and choose to add to your own playlist.

 

Is your body like a racecar?

Maybe you should think of your body as a racecar! For long-distance racing (swimming, biking, running), nutrition is the key to success. That is assuming you appropriately trained for the race and pace yourself based on your training. The biggest thing we see is the lack of knowledge around calories and the fear of not having enough salt. Cramping, bonking, blowing up, are all things we want to avoid. What causes them?

Cramping

Cramping is caused by overuse and lack of sodium. Cramping in a short-distance event is due to overuse and not the body’s lack of sodium. Cramping in a long-distance event can be due to sodium, but it can also be due to overuse. If it is due to lack of sodium, it will not be in one isolated area, like your calf. You will feel the cramping across the entire body. Once this happens, it is nearly impossible to recover during any mid-distance event.

Bonking

Caused by running out of fuel during a long-distance event. It is almost impossible to truly bonk during a short event (less than one hour).

Blowing up

Blowing up is the most common issue that most people confuse with the other two. Blowing up is caused by going too fast. Using your muscles at a level for which you did not train them will cause them to cramp up. If you can average 20 mph at your local TT of 15 miles, this does not mean you can hold this average for the bike of a half or full Ironman.

To keep it easy, you want to think of your body like a racecar. Your car needs three basic things to keep running: Gas, oil, and electricity. Click To Tweet

3 basic things the body needs to perform at a long distance event

The three things your body needs to perform during a long-distance event are water, calories, and sodium. Everyone’s body processes calories, water, and sodium at different rates. It is not possible to replace everything you burn in terms of calories, but the replacement of water and sodium while you slowly dig a calorie hole is the key to success.

Your body needs calories like a racecar needs gas.

Gas is like your calories. Calories are the fuel your body needs to run.

Gas is like your calories. This is the fuel your body needs to run.  Calories can come in the form of Clif Shot Energy Gels, Clif Bars, Clif Bloks, chews, breakfast, or any other food or liquid that has calories. Watch your sports drinks as they may have calories as well.

Oil is like your water. Water lubricates your joints and allows your engine to process and burn fuel.

Electricity is like your sodium. Sodium is what your body needs to allow its muscles to fire.

You can be low in these different areas, but being empty in these areas is what causes major trouble. The purpose of this analogy is to help people better understand what is going on with your body. Checking on properly identify nutrition issues and better keep your body running like a racecar.

Run softly you could take time off your run

As triathletes, it seems that the inherent beating our legs take while on training runs often leads to some of the most nagging and potentially severe injuries. That dreaded pain on the inside of a shin. The chronically inflamed IT band. A perpetually tight hamstring. The list goes on. Too many times we chalk this up as “part of the process.” What many athletes do not realize is that by applying a few subtle technique changes to running form, common injuries can be eradicated and running speed can be gained. By being quiet while you run you can achieve increased economy of movement; in other words, run softly.

run softly

Runner at the 2017 Kerrville Triathlon Festival (credit: Ed Sparks)

While on your next training run for the Kerrville Tri, leave the iPod at home and prepare to listen while you run softly. Listen to your gait. Is there a heavy sigh from the ground on every foot strike? Do you notice a shuffling sound similar to autumn foliage moving along at the pace of a breeze? If you are picking up on sounds that are more audible than not, you may need to work on your foot strike and run more softly.

When you run softly it allows your foot to strike the ground and transition from the initial contact This is often considered heel strike or a mid-foot strike, with less breaking force (ground reaction force). Click To Tweet

This means that less impact is transferred from this brief, but violent stop throughout your body. Think of a plane landing gently at an optimal angle. Now think of a plane landing that comes down a little hard and jolts the entire cabin. This is not entirely dissimilar to the jolt your body takes each time your foot lands. When coaches tell athletes to run with light feet, this is precisely what they are referring to.

On runs, occasionally think about foot strike and quick transition. As your heel comes in contact with the ground try to roll your foot forward to the mid-foot, then to the ball of your foot, and then to a strong, propulsive toe-off. Work on doing this seamlessly and without interruption. Another important key to this skill is never allowing heel strike to be forward of your knee. Your heel strike should occur directly under your knee and your knee should be directly beneath your center of gravity. Look down while in heel strike to mid-stance of your stride. At that point, you should see no more than the tips of your toes extending from beneath your knee. If you see more than just the tips, then you’re creating a greater ground reaction force and more resistance – increasing your risk for injury.

Like anything, running softly takes time to develop. Remind yourself to run softly because the impact can be huge. Click To Tweet