Posts

Make a pit stop anywhere, anytime during your training rides with this Gas Station Refuel Guide

You pump up the bike tires, check your saddle height, cover yourself with sunscreen, you open the cupboard trying to figure out what to bring for a mid-ride snack, but nothing looks appealing. Instead of agonizing on what to bring, why not just ride “light” and stop at a gas station to refuel. Gas stations are everywhere. It is a good place to stop, take a break, stretch your legs, use the restroom and refuel.  Here are some ideas on what to pick up from the gas station to refuel during training rides as you get ready for Kerrville Tri

Short Ride Refuel

For short rides, 1 to 2 hours, a bottle of water, or your favorite electrolyte drink are great choices to rehydrate. If you notice that you’re hungry, go for a banana, energy bar, or even candy such as Skittles. These are all great ways to get some quick calories in. They are easy to digest and allow the body to absorb the calories quickly.

Refuel Guide for Medium Rides

For medium rides, 2 to 3 hours, in addition to water and electrolytes drinks, also consider having a coke. Studies that found that caffeine can enhance exercise performance. And for your snack, consider having something high in calories and with some fat. Food with a bit of fat will keep you feeling full. Muffins, Snickers, and trail mix are some great options. Keep a good balance of carbs, protein, and fat for sustained energy.

The Long Haul Refuel

For rides longer than 3 hours, consider getting food and drink that is appetizing and you’ll actually enjoy. If you have been on the bike for hours, the last thing you probably want is another gel or chew. On those hot days, an ice-cold soda or Red Bull is a great way to refresh yourself. Maybe even consider getting an ice cream sandwich. If the gas station is serving fresh-made food, that is a great option. A fresh-made hot breakfast taco is a great mood booster when you are in the middle of a long ride and feeling tired. The goal is to get food that you want to eat and get the needed calories to finish the ride strong. 

You’re Ready to Ride!

How to Refuel at the Gas Station During Training Rides

Pro tip: Don’t forget to grab your debit card and look over these must-know rules of the road before you head out for your next ride!  Now you know exactly what to eat to keep your energy levels where they should be during your workout. Next time you’re out for a training ride and don’t shy away from stopping at the closest gas station! With this Gas Station Refuel Guide, you’ll know exactly what you need to replenish your body so you can get back on the road!

If you have a favorite, go-to snack at the gas station you grab when you’re in need of a quick refuel, share it with us! We’re always looking for new snacks and treats to try during our training rides. We’re on Facebook and Twitter and would love to hear your suggestions.

Knowing the rules of the road is crucial to keep you and the rest of your squad safe

Follow these rules of the road every time you ride and to stay safe during your training for your upcoming triathlon!

9 must-know safety tips for your next ride

Stay safe during your training rides by knowing the rules of the road. Whether you’re riding to lunch with co-workers around the block or completing a long training ride for Kerrville Triathlon Festival, the following group riding guidelines will come in handy. Knowing these rules of the road will also make the ride more enjoyable and safer for everyone involved. Memorize these 9 Rules of the Road to cover your butt and keep you safe. 

Cycling Rules of the Road for your upcoming ride

  1. Complete a quick, pre-ride safety check.
  2. Obey all traffic laws. Here are a few examples: Yield to pedestrians, use the bike lane, use hand signals, and watch out for traffic lights! Just like in a car, the same rules apply when riding a bike.  Do not run red lights!
  3. Operate bike in such a manner as to not offend or endanger motorists, pedestrians, etc.
  4. Wear a helmet for safety (and be a good model for children).
  5. Activate all lights on bikes.
  6. Wear reflective gear that makes the group more visible, even in the daytime.
  7. Ride single file when you’re with others except in areas where it is safe to ride side-by-side.
  8. Avoid slowing down abruptly or making any other sudden moves.
  9. Ask experienced riders questions when you’re not sure what is occurring.

Important hand signals

On your left! You’ve probably experienced fellow cyclists shouting at you in efforts to get your attention on the road. But, hand signals, instead of words, are used to warn riders of potential danger on the roadway. Especially when riding in a pack, the only cyclist who has enough visual warning is the front cyclist. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the lead rider to warn the cyclists behind them. If the lead cyclist (or the cyclist in front of you):

  • shakes their hand to the right = there’s a pothole, branch, or some obstacle to the right
  • shakes their hand to the left = there’s an obstacle to the left
  • puts hand behind their posterior = follow right behind them as there might be obstacles on both sides
  • puts right hand down with the flat of the hand facing you = lead cyclist is slowing down or coming to a stop

It’s crucial to know these hand signals to keep yourself safe when riding alone to avoid a collision with another cyclist. Last but not least, being aware of your surroundings is essential to keep yourself safe during a ride. Be on the lookout and apply these rules of the road to keep yourself safe next time you go for a ride.