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Performance Sunglasses for the trendiest triathletes

When it comes to being a triathlete, there is a lot of gear needed to race your best the morning of a tri. However, there’s an important piece of tri gear that often gets overlooked: performance sunglasses. After all, you wear them for 2/3 of the tri during the run leg and bike leg. We know looking for the right pair of shades that look great and meets both your running and cycling needs can be difficult. Find a pair that meets your personal style and performance needs with these recommendations of reliable, stylish performance sunglasses for your upcoming tri.

 

STYLISH PERFORMANCE SUNGLASSES FOR THE TRENDY TRIATHLETE

Lookin’ cool out on the Kerrville Tri course!

Bottom Line:

Performance sunglasses are a must. They protect your eyes from dirt, harmful rays from the sun, and other possible debris that may come your way during a race. The last thing you want to do is fidget with a pair in the middle of your race. Having the right pair of sunglasses can make or break your performance on race day. With these stylish performance sunglasses, you’ll be ready to crush it this year’s Kerrville Tri, and look cool in the process! Keep this in mind next time you’re in the market for some tri shades: the lighter the better, protection from UV rays is crucial, and comfort is key.

Implement these group riding guidelines on your next ride

Group riding provides cyclists with enjoyment, exercise, training, support from other cyclists, and safety. Whether you’re riding to lunch with co-workers or completing a 50-mile Kerrville Triathlon Festival training ride with your crew, the following group riding guidelines will come in handy. Knowing these basic group riding guidelines will also make the ride more enjoyable and safer for everyone involved.

* Complete a quick, pre-ride safety check.

* Obey all traffic laws.

* Operate bike in such a manner as to not offend or endanger motorists, pedestrians, etc.

* Wear a helmet for safety (and be a good model for children).

* Activate all lights on bikes.

* Wear reflective gear that makes the group more visible, even in the daytime.

* Ride single file except in areas where it is safe to ride side-by-side.

* When riding in a pack, look at “shoulder level” of cyclists in front of you. This allows you to see what is happening further up the road and not focus on the cyclists in front of you. Fixing your gaze on the back tire of the person in front of you doesn’t give you enough time to react should the entire group slow down.

* It is the responsibility of the lead rider to notify the cyclist behind them of approaching issues by saying, “jogger up, cyclist up.” This includes any potential danger that may lie ahead. It is the responsibility of each cyclist to pass the caution back to the person behind them.

Important hand signals

* Hand signals, instead of words, are used to warn riders of potential danger on the roadway. In a pack, oftentimes, the only cyclist who has enough visual warning is the front cyclist. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the lead rider to warn the cyclists behind them. If the lead cyclist (or the cyclist in front of you):

  • shakes their hand to the right = there’s a pothole, branch, or some obstacle to the right
  • shakes their hand to the left = there’s an obstacle to the left
  • puts hand behind their posterior = follow right behind them as there might be obstacles on both sides
  • puts right hand down with the flat of the hand facing you = lead cyclist is slowing down or coming to a stop

* Avoid slowing down abruptly or making any other sudden moves.

* Ask experienced riders questions when you’re not sure what is occurring.