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Follow our advice to get better at hydrating while cycling

If you’re new to cycling, one of the challenges to get accustomed to is knowing how to drink water while peddling. Just as there is skill needed to balance, ride curves, and pump uphills, technique is needed to hydrate without losing your balance and falling off your bike. Here are some tips for hydrating while cycling.

Use a squirt-top bottle instead of a cap bottle

A water bottle with a cap requires you to twist it open, which is cumbersome to do with one hand on a bike. When it comes to squirt-top bottles, you can simply use your teeth to open the valve and start drinking with one hand as you control your bike with the other. The convenience a squirt-top bottle offers during cycling allows you to focus on the course more and avoid any accident.

Make use of the bottle cage on your bike

To carry water on the road, you can use a bottle cage on your bike. The bottle cage can be installed between the bars, on the frame, or near the saddle to help you reach your drink with zero fuss. Here are the pros and cons of each bottle cage.

Aero Bottle Cage

This type of cage is designed so that it can be attached to multiple parts of the bike frame. Most other cages can only be mounted to the frame.

Pros
– easiest to access
– option to install it either vertical or horizontal
– using horizontal bottles at the front can decrease aerodynamic drag

Cons
– poor aerodynamics compared to other cages
– using vertical bottles can cause even higher aerodynamic drag.

Bike Frame Cage

These are very common bottle holders that can be placed on the frame, seat post, or handlebars.

Pros
– slim aero bottles on the down tube are less affected by drag and side wind.

Cons
– intermediate aerodynamic drag
– large frame-mounted bottles are expensive and difficult to clean.

Rear Hydration System

This is an aerodynamic bottle that is mounted behind the seat post. These are more so used by competitive triathletes partaking in very long distances.

Pros
– best choice in terms of aerodynamics
– least affected by side wind

Cons
– requires a cage with a strong grip to prevent bottle-launching
– must be made of a favorable material to oppose side sway

Take advantage of the straight-aways

Think about when the ideal time to take a sip is and be ready to do so. Trying to pull the water bottle out on curves is much more challenging, so wait until the trail is flat and straight to get your drink.

Practice, Practice, Practice

Ride up and down your street over and over and practice. Pull your water bottle out of the cage, take a sip, then put it back while moving forward. Start off slow and pick up speed as you get more comfortable.

Pro Tip: Avoid quenching your thirst in one go

Kerrville TriathlonExerting your body through exercise causes dehydration which makes you thirsty. Despite your desire to rapidly quench your thirst it’s important to not drink too much. It can be counterproductive and negatively affect your performance. It is best to avoid drinking mouthfuls and only take a few sips occasionally. You can hydrate yourself effectively without running the risk of drinking too much.

To make sure you do not run yourself dry, you should consume around 600-900 ml of water, per hour, during a triathlon, in addition to other nutritional needs. Although triathlons will have water available in transition and on the run course, not all triathlons provide an aid station on the bike course. Make sure the water bottle(s) on your bike are full so you don’t run out of water.

Hydrating while cycling can be tricky if you’re not used to it. With a secure bottle cage and lots of practice, you’ll be able to master this skill in no time.

What are the different triathlon distances? We cover the basics to help you choose the right one for you

A triathlon is a sports event that rewards your grit, stamina, and endurance. It is a comprehensive competition which includes swimming, cycling, and running. A triathlon is obviously challenging, but you can do well with proper training and a positive mentality.

When you hear triathlon, you might think of mass swims and endurance professionals racing in a full distance triathlon – Ironman – which involves a 2.4 mile swim and 112-mile bike ride before culminating in a 26.2 marathon run. It is a common misconception that is all triathlons can be.

In fact, there are many different triathlon distances, with most of them being very beginner-friendly.

An important factor that determines its difficulty is the distance to be covered. Knowing the distance implications of various triathlons helps you choose the right one for yourself and prepare for it accordingly. Let us look at different triathlon distances.

Super sprint

Super sprint triathlon is a shorter distance sprint triathlon. This distance event usually covers a total distance usually of about 8 miles (3 km). It is perfect for those who want a taste of what triathlon is all about.  The distance breakup can vary greatly in this distance but is usually is 300 to 500 m of swimming, 10 km (6.2 miles) of cycling, and 2-3 miles of running. Despite being considered a beginner’s triathlon because of the short distance, it can be just as tough for veterans that want to see their max speed. 

Sprint

For beginners who have some previous experience and want to take it up a notch, a sprint triathlon is a logical progression after a super sprint. This is one of the most popular distances for triathlons. This distance can vary greatly as well. So be sure to check the specifics when researching triathlons in your area. A sprint triathlon is usually about a total of 15-25 miles. An example of a sprint triathlon distance is a 500m Swim, 14.5 mile Bike, 5 Km Run.

Taking part in a sprint triathlon is a great way to check how your training is going when you are training for a longer distance. Participating in a sprint 6-4 months before an Olympic or Half Distance is a great way to practice and test your race tactics.

Standard/International/Quarter/ Olympic

The name gives away the increased difficulty that comes with this triathlon. This event distance took on the name Olympic after triathlon joined the Olympic Games in 2000. With an overall distance of around 32 miles (51.5 km), this triathlon requires you to exhibit a higher endurance level. It comprises 1500 m (0.9 mile) of swimming, 40 km (24.8 miles) of cycling, followed by 10 km (6.2 miles) of running. 

Training for an Olympic takes significantly more time and planning. There are usually race cut off times at these events, meaning knowing your pace is very important.

Half Distance/ 70.3

Half distance triathlons have become increasingly popular over the years. This 70.3 mile-long strenuous physical course involves covering 1930 m (1.2 miles) in water, 90 km (56 miles) on the bike, and 21 km (13.1 miles) on foot.

Racing a half distance is very obtainable with a structured training program. Half distances can take up to 8.5 hours to complete. Athletes racing in these longer distance events should also pay attention to on-course support and have a nutrition plan. A 70.3 distance is great for athletes that want to focus on endurance over speed. Just like with moving up from a sprint to Olympic, racing a half distance as part of your full distance training is a great idea.

Full Distance

If half distance is not enough for you, you can double the distance by participating in a full distance triathlon. This is commonly associated with the Ironman brand but there are tons of awesome events that offer a full distance triathlon. Covering 140.6 miles (a little over 226 km), a full iron triathlon is extremely tough, even for veterans. It requires you to swim for 3900 m (2.4 miles), cycle for 180 km (112 miles), and run for 42.2 km (26.2 miles).

Athletes racing the 140.6 distance should invest in more specialized equipment like a triathlon bike and potentially a wetsuit. The training regimen for a full distance is much longer and requires a dedicated schedule.

Ultra

From double triathlon to decuple triathlon, every version that exceeds full distance triathlon falls in the ultra category. These triathlons can stretch over a number of days. The most-demanding forms of triathlon fall in this group.

These distances can be seen as milestones for you to reach over your triathlon career. Choosing the most suitable distance, as per your ability and experience, can prove crucial to how you perform in the competition. Make sure to pick a distance that doesn’t push you too much and that you can enjoy it.

Infographic showing the different triathlon distance that are explained within the blog

Why Creating a Relay Team is The Best Way to Tri

Just when you thought Kerrville Tri couldn’t get any more fun, now you can make it a team effort! Recruit friends, family, or co-workers and create your relay team for Kerrville Triathlon’s 10th-anniversary celebration this September 26-27! The 10th annual tri takes place in the heart of the Texas Hill Country, Kerrville, Texas, with scenic views guaranteed. Relay teams can consist of two or three individuals to help you divide and conquer your upcoming tri while having a blast in the process!  Check out a few reasons why relay teams are a great way to get into triathlon and why you should create a team for this year’s Smokin’ Good Tri. 

Try something new

Maybe you know about triathlon, maybe you’re new to the scene. Perhaps you’ve cheered and supported friends at their triathlons, but you’ve never participated in one. Creating a relay team is the best way to get introduced to the sport! Everyone experiences pre-race nerves, especially if it is your first time ever completing a tri! That’s why building a relay team of two or three will help take some of the pressure off so you can focus on the fun. Split the tri three ways, or if your team has two members, one person does the swim, while the other person does the bike and the run. Depending on your individual skill levels, this can be accomplished in any combination. Train with your team, experience the highs and the lows, and get a taste of your new favorite sport.

The more the merrierThe more the merrier when you create a relay team

You can always get one friend to tri along with you, but why do that when you can triple the fun?! A three-person relay team is triple the action so, get two friends or co-workers to create your relay team.  Here are a few ways to take your team spirit to the next level during your training!

  • Create a sweet team name
  • Make custom gear to show your team spirit during training
  • Start thinking about what your team will wear on race day
  • Come up with a team motto
  • Have fun with it!

What feel is your team going for? Will your team opt for funny costumes for laughs out on the course? Or some matching outfits to show your fellow triathletes your team means business! With so many choices, your team will love this. And it’s a great way to really get you excited to keep working towards your goal.

You could use the help

Injuries happen. No matter what lengths you go to to stay safe during training, sometimes they just happen. But are you going to let that stop you from achieving your fitness goals? Not so fast! An injury that may prevent you from swimming might not stop you from cycling or running. creating a relay team for Kerrville Tri to test your boundaries during your team training sessions is a great way to stay active while continuing to strengthen your muscles! Just be sure you’re comfortable and aren’t in pain when training.  You never know, cross-training might just help speed up your recovery!

Making memories at Kerrville Tri with your relay team membersMaking memories

Create a relay team that brings your buddies back together to make some unbeatable memories. Get the old high school/college crew together. Make it a family affair and create an all-sibling team, or give the ‘rents a challenge you know they won’t be able to refuse! Take on a new challenge with your run group and create a relay team as a way to expand your fitness routine. Whatever direction you go, make this something you won’t soon forget. Participating with loved ones by your side and cheering you on, creating a relay team will make your Kerrville Tri experience unlike any other. 

Push Your Limits

Triathlon is a fun way to push your body’s limits, but we know making time to train for three sports can be difficult on top of everything else life throws your way. If you have a tight schedule and know you won’t be able to properly train for multiple disciplines, focus on one or two disciplines to push your limits! Find someone who swims like a fish in the water. Add a member who gets speeding tickets on their bike for going too fast. Pick a runner whose feet seem to never touch the ground because of their speed. Assemble this super team and hold each other accountable to keep up with training! Before you know it, you’ll be ready to show up on race day ready to set some new records or even take home 1st place!

Whatever your reason for creating a relay team, there are two things left to do: build your team to divide and conquer Kerrville Tri and register!

Avoid Bonking & Keep From Blowing Up

What is bonking? Bonking is when you run out of energy to complete your event. Like a car running out of gas 10 miles into a 20-mile trip. You have no fuel to continue. What is blowing up? Blowing up is starting way too fast or maintaining too high of a pace at different points of your event, which can lead to surpassing your lactate threshold & cramping causing you to stop or slow down. Like if you just put the pedal to the floor in your car and blow your gaskets or transmission. You still have plenty of fuel, but you broke other parts of your car. If you struggle with this, keep reading to learn how to avoid the bonk and prevent from blowing up. 

To keep it simple, here are the top tips to Avoid Bonking and Keep from Blowing Up

  1. Know Your Pace. Know what pace you are capable of holding for any period of time to avoid bonking. The idea is at the start of the event for the effort level to feel controlled and relatively easy. As you progress through the event, your effort level will increase to hold your pace. At the end of your event, the effort level will be extremely high to maintain your initial start pace. Even splits or negative splits are how you PR. 
  2. Know How to Fuel Properly. Know the calorie needs for the distance you are doing. If you are doing a short event (less than 45 minutes) you will not need anything more than water during your event. Your body will have enough energy from your previous night’s meal and your morning breakfast to get you through. Chances are on the shorter events you will be moving faster and having a bunch of food in your stomach is counterproductive to going fast.
  3. Know When to Refuel. If your event is longer than 45 minutes, this is when you need to start thinking about fueling for success. In general, depending on your height, weight, sport, and effort level, you will burn between 10 to 25 calories per minute. The goal is to time your calorie intake throughout your event so that you are just keeping the tank full enough to avoid bonking and running out of energy. Another rule is that you want to consume the calories before you need them. My rule of thumb is that I take in a few calories every 15 minutes starting at the 30-minute mark for any event over 1 hour. Remember you are balancing your intake with what was in your tank when you started. 

Things to consider per sport

  • Swimming. Swimming is not the ideal sport for taking in calories during a triathlon.  When you are completing a tri, you need to consider calorie-intake into account and be prepared to start fueling early on the bike to avoid bonking.
  • Avoid BonkingCycling. Cycling is built for fueling. You have bottle cages on your bike, the right choice in your race clothing will have pockets for holding gels and other forms of nutrition. There are also tons of other equipment you can add to your bike to pretty much carry as much as you want. One key is to use the aid stations on course so that you are not carrying too much. Why spend a ton of money on an 18-pound bike when you are going to carry 3 to 6 pounds of nutrition? Learning how to take a bottle hand up or even stop quickly at an aid station to make sure you have what you need is important and worth every second that you might think you are losing by just blowing by the aid station without refueling. Items we recommend consuming on the bike: water, fluids with calories, gels, chews, and bars.
  • Running. A good pocket in your run shorts, shirt, or a SpiBelt is perfect for holding a couple of gels for your run. A small handheld water bottle can also come in handy if you are needing a little water to wash down your gel or stay hydrated. Aid stations are also the key for runners. Knowing the frequency of the aid stations and what they will be supplied with before the event will help you come up with the proper nutrition plan on the run. Items I recommend consuming while running: water, fluids with calories, gels, and chews.

Tips To Avoid Bonking

To sum it up, what you need to do to avoid bonking is, know your body (pace),  know the event (what nutrition do they offer on course), have a plan to carry additional fuel, and then practice with different amounts and mixtures of nutrition at different paces until you have the perfect plan. This will all vary based on the type and length of your event, so be sure to use these tips during your Kerrville Tri training. After all, practice makes perfect!

Knowing the rules of the road is crucial to keep you and the rest of your squad safe

Follow these rules of the road every time you ride and to stay safe during your training for your upcoming triathlon!

9 must-know safety tips for your next ride

Stay safe during your training rides by knowing the rules of the road. Whether you’re riding to lunch with co-workers around the block or completing a long training ride for Kerrville Triathlon Festival, the following group riding guidelines will come in handy. Knowing these rules of the road will also make the ride more enjoyable and safer for everyone involved. Memorize these 9 Rules of the Road to cover your butt and keep you safe. 

Cycling Rules of the Road for your upcoming ride

  1. Complete a quick, pre-ride safety check.
  2. Obey all traffic laws. Here are a few examples: Yield to pedestrians, use the bike lane, use hand signals, and watch out for traffic lights! Just like in a car, the same rules apply when riding a bike.  Do not run red lights!
  3. Operate bike in such a manner as to not offend or endanger motorists, pedestrians, etc.
  4. Wear a helmet for safety (and be a good model for children).
  5. Activate all lights on bikes.
  6. Wear reflective gear that makes the group more visible, even in the daytime.
  7. Ride single file when you’re with others except in areas where it is safe to ride side-by-side.
  8. Avoid slowing down abruptly or making any other sudden moves.
  9. Ask experienced riders questions when you’re not sure what is occurring.

Important hand signals

On your left! You’ve probably experienced fellow cyclists shouting at you in efforts to get your attention on the road. But, hand signals, instead of words, are used to warn riders of potential danger on the roadway. Especially when riding in a pack, the only cyclist who has enough visual warning is the front cyclist. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the lead rider to warn the cyclists behind them. If the lead cyclist (or the cyclist in front of you):

  • shakes their hand to the right = there’s a pothole, branch, or some obstacle to the right
  • shakes their hand to the left = there’s an obstacle to the left
  • puts hand behind their posterior = follow right behind them as there might be obstacles on both sides
  • puts right hand down with the flat of the hand facing you = lead cyclist is slowing down or coming to a stop

It’s crucial to know these hand signals to keep yourself safe when riding alone to avoid a collision with another cyclist. Last but not least, being aware of your surroundings is essential to keep yourself safe during a ride. Be on the lookout and apply these rules of the road to keep yourself safe next time you go for a ride.

Performance Sunglasses for the trendiest triathletes

When it comes to being a triathlete, there is a lot of gear needed to race your best the morning of a tri. However, there’s an important piece of tri gear that often gets overlooked: performance sunglasses. After all, you wear them for 2/3 of the tri during the run leg and bike leg. We know looking for the right pair of shades that look great and meets both your running and cycling needs can be difficult. Find a pair that meets your personal style and performance needs with these recommendations of reliable, stylish performance sunglasses for your upcoming tri.

 

STYLISH PERFORMANCE SUNGLASSES FOR THE TRENDY TRIATHLETE

Lookin’ cool out on the Kerrville Tri course!

Bottom Line:

Performance sunglasses are a must. They protect your eyes from dirt, harmful rays from the sun, and other possible debris that may come your way during a race. The last thing you want to do is fidget with a pair in the middle of your race. Having the right pair of sunglasses can make or break your performance on race day. With these stylish performance sunglasses, you’ll be ready to crush it this year’s Kerrville Tri, and look cool in the process! Keep this in mind next time you’re in the market for some tri shades: the lighter the better, protection from UV rays is crucial, and comfort is key.

A record number of triathletes, more than 1800, registered for The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including this female sprint finisher posting in front of the Kerrville Tri sign.

Congrats to all the 2019 Kerrville Tri finishers!

More than 4000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to Kerrville, Texas, for the 9th annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival. A record number of triathletes, more than 1800, (most in event history) registered for the Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas. Participants gave their all on a course highlighted by swimming in Nimitz Lake, cycling through the Texas Hill Country, and running along the Guadalupe River. Participants were treated to fajitas, cold beer, snacks, and an opportunity to recover in the refreshing waters of the Guadalupe River after crossing the finish line. Kerrville Tri also launched best pricing for 2020, which ends on Tuesday, Oct. 8th.

“This is my favorite race and the course is beautiful,” said Meredith Townley, who completed the quarter distance (3:22:07) on Sunday. “I love the hometown feel that Kerrville and the Hill Country provide and how everyone – vendors, sponsors, spectators, etc. – truly supports everyone else!” 

The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including these triathletes floating the Guadalupe River in their Kerrville Tri floats!

Participants float the Guadalupe River after crossing the 2019 Kerrville Tri finish line!

The family-friendly Kerrville Triathlon Festival took place from Friday, September 27th, to Sunday, September 29th. It featured two days of triathlon action and a bustling two-day expo. Six different events were featured, sprint, quarter, half, aquabike, relays, and a kids fun run. The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint relay, and kids fun run took place on Saturday. All other events, including the quarter and the half, took place on Sunday. Before the action began, participants, volunteers, and friends and family went to the annual Friday night Kerrville Tri Mixer. Inn of the Hills, the host hotel, hosted the Mixer and the expo and packet pick up. Grammy award-winning artist and Debra Zapata sprint participant Shawn Colvin sang Saturday’s national anthem.

“I love registering for and completing an affordable half distance triathlon in the Texas Hill Country,” said Michelle Bonathan, Kerrville Triathlon half distance open division female champion (5:22:50). “The support and energy from the spectators and volunteers were top-notch!”

Peter Murray (1:02:01), of Austin, Texas, won Saturday’s sprint event. Marla Briley (1:14:23), of Austin, Texas, won the female division. Sunday’s winners and their times follow: quarter – female winner, Jami O’Toole (2:34:38), male winner, Mark Saroni (2:03:20); half – female winner, Michelle Bonathan, male winner, Jack Cartwright (4:53:58). Results for Saturday and Sunday are available. 

Perks for record number of triathletes

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including these future triathletes at the free kids fun run.

The kids take off at the free kids fun run!

New for 2019, participants received a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float and recovered in the Guadalupe River after crossing the finish line. Athletes received a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative hat. They also received a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. They enjoyed a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, snacks, and the ever-popular beer garden. The event also had professional timing and photography. A great volunteer crew, thousands of supportive spectators, and an electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. Photos can be found on the Kerrville Triathlon Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds in addition to the website.

The Kerrville Triathlon would like to thank sponsors H-E-B, City Limit Cycles, the City of Kerrville, Kerrville Fire Department, Kerrville Police Department, Kerr County Sheriff’s Department, Kerrville Convention and Visitors Bureau, Peterson Health, Jack and Adam’s Fredericksburg, SPIbelt, Peak Fitness, MO-RANCH, Hill Country Bicycle Works, Grape Juice, Mamacita’s, Camp Gladiator, and Gatorade.

The largest field in event history consists of triathletes from 17 different states

High Five Events concludes their 2019 triathlon season with the largest field in Kerrville Triathlon Festival history. More than 1800 athletes have registered for this beloved Hill Country event. The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas features a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and a run course along the Guadalupe River. The ninth annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival will take place on September 27-29, in Kerrville, Texas. The final price increase occurs tonight, Monday, September 23rd, at 11:59.

Image of custom float all Kerrville Triathlon participants will receive! They're part of the largest field in event history.“I’ve heard great things about Kerrville Triathlon, from it’s scenic course to the big party at the finish line festival,” said Bryan Deibel of Austin, Texas, who is registered for Saturday’s Debra Zapata Sprint. “I’m even more pumped to float the Guadalupe River after my sprint in my Kerrville Tri-branded float!”

Perks for Kerrville Triathlon participants

New for 2019, all participants will receive a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float so they can recover in the Guadalupe River near the finish line festival. Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative trucker hat. They’ll also get a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. Once they cross the finish line, triathletes can enjoy a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, snacks, beer garden, and an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Professional timing and photography, a great volunteer crew, hundreds of supportive spectators, and an electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. 

“We’re excited about Kerrville Tri’s largest field ever and ready to welcome triathletes from all over to the Texas Hill Country,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “When you combine the three-day-long festival with the beauty of the Texas Hill Country you can see why Kerrville Tri is a true destination triathlon.”

Registration is still open

Current pricing for all events follows: Debra Zapata Sprint ($105), sprint aquabike ($105), sprint relay ($165), quarter ($155), quarter aquabike ($155), half ($245), half aquabike ($245), half relay ($295), kids fun run (free), Virtual Kerrville Triathlon, which can be associated with any distance ($45). 

The Debra Zapata Sprint distance triathlon, sprint aquabike, sprint relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 28th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 29th. Participants can pick up their packet at the Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup. The expo is located at the host hotel, Inn of the Hills. The expo and packet pickup, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Friday, Sept. 27th, and Saturday, Sept. 28th. Participants can see the entire pricing structure and register on the website.

A couple of hundred spots remain as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas nears sellout

Friends pose before the 2018 Kerrville Triathlon. The 2019 edition nears sellout.

Tell your friends to register before Kerrville Tri sells out!

Excitement for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon Festival continues to build as registration numbers continue their historic climb. The beloved destination triathlon has a limited amount of spots remaining as it nears a sellout. Last year, more than 2000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to the Texas Hill Country. The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas features a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and run course along the Guadalupe River. The 9th annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival will take place on September 27-29, in Kerrville, Texas.

“My wife and I both love Kerrville Tri, we’re racing and volunteering again this year,” said Mark Wignall, who has participated in the Kerrville Tri for the past three years. “The entire course is beautiful and it’s a short drive from Austin and San Antonio, making it the perfect destination event.”

Branded floats for all

New for 2019, all participants will receive a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float so they can recover in the Guadalupe River near the finish line festival. Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative trucker hat. They’ll also get a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. Once they cross the finish line, triathletes can enjoy a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, and snacks. They will also enjoy the beer garden and have an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Kerrville Tri features professional timing and photography. Participants can draw energy from a great volunteer crew and hundreds of supportive spectators. An electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. 

“An increasing number of triathletes are hearing what we’ve known for nearly a decade, Kerrville Tri is The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “When you combine the three-day-long festival with the beauty of the Texas Hill Country you can see why Kerrville Tri is a true destination triathlon.”

Limited amount of Kerrville Tri spots remain

Current pricing for all events follows: Debra Zapata Sprint ($105), sprint aquabike ($105), sprint relay ($165), quarter ($155), quarter aquabike ($155), half ($245), half aquabike ($245), half relay ($295), kids fun run (free), Virtual Kerrville Triathlon, which can be associated with any distance ($45). 

The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint aquabike, sprint relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 28th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 29th. The Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup will take place at the host hotel, Inn of the Hills. The expo and packet pickup, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Friday, Sept. 27th, and Saturday, Sept. 28th. Participants can see the entire pricing structure and register on the website.

Look your best in your Kerrville Tri race day photos with these great tips

Swim

1. Think about your form

Looking good, heading into transition at Kerrville Tri

We have professional photographers out along the racecourse to capture your best moments throughout the triathlon. Since you know photographs are being taken, attempt to tighten up your form during the swim. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at how awesome a mid-swim photo of yourself can be!

2. Be ready to Smile

As you are making your way out of the water into T1, you can count on one of our amazing photographers to be there to capture the moment. Pro tip: smile BIG! We love seeing our participants having a great time moving on to the next portion of the tri, and these are often some of the coolest photos we get from Kerrville Tri!

Bike

1. Check your positioning

Giving the camera a thumbs up and a smile on the bike

Flash a quick thumbs up to the camera when you see it along the bike portion!

Bike photos are an awesome chance to get a great close-up race picture. However, no photo is worth losing control of your bike. We know everyone has their favorite riding position to be in when in the saddle. Rather than changing the position you’re comfortable with, simply give the photographer a smile or a thumbs up when you cruise past them! You’ll be very impressed at how they turn out. Keep your eyes on the road and flash the photographer a smile when you pass them by!

Run

1.Position your bib in T2

To make sure your personalized bib can be seen in your race photos, place it in the front-center of your race tri suit or shirt.  This is also important for the automated photosystems to use this to tag your photos. This way you don’t have to sift through thousands of photos to try and find yourself, FinisherPix will do it for you!

2. Stand Tall

After the swim and bike portion, we know you’ll feel tired throughout the run course. This is when we tend to let our shoulders fall forward. But, when you see the photographers up ahead, stand up a little taller! No matter how you feel on the inside, this is a sure way to make you look effortless during the run portion.

3. Lengthen your stride

Running through the Kerrville Tri run course

Look at that stride!

Elongate the appearance of your legs by lengthening your stride for a couple of steps when you see a camera! You don’t want to do this for the entire run portion of Smokin’ Good Tri, but it won’t hurt for a couple of photos when you catch a glimpse of the camera (not to mention, you’ll love how long your legs will look in these photos)

4. Relax your face and think positive

We know, easier said than done, but start practicing now when you go out for your training runs. Make your cheeks soft and say the word “Money.” Give it a try in the mirror and see for yourself. Hopefully, you’ll already be smiling from all the fun your having during the triathlon, but when you see a photographer ahead of you relax your face and enjoy yourself! We can assure you, the pictures are bound to turn out fantastic! Giving the photographer a thumbs up, about to cross the finish line!

5. Have fun!

This is by far the most important thing to remember if you want some incredible race photos. If you’re having a good time, it’ll show in the pictures. The photographers are there to capture your accomplishments, so the most important thing to remember is to have fun! You’ll be able to look back at these photos forever, so it’s important to make the most out of your experience.

Follow these steps, and get ready to look your best in all your Kerrville Tri race day photos! Pre-order your photos now with FinisherPix to get a great discounted price!