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Ensure your new running shoes are broken in and race-day-ready

You have an upcoming triathlon and all your running shoes need to be retired or are on the verge. So of course you’re ready for a new pair. Or two! There’s plenty of advice that can help you find what’s right for you if you don’t know exactly what you want. They’ll take care of you. Don’t start running in them right away. You’ll need to break in your new running shoes, even if they’re the same version as your old pair. This is a vital step that can make your future runs more comfortable and reduce the chance of injury. Utilize the 3 tips below to properly break in your new running shoes. They’ll get you race-day-ready and you’ll be more comfortable on the run.

#1 – Take the walk, then run approach

Give yourself plenty of time to break in your new shoes.

Don’t rush the breaking-in process. Your feet need time to adjust to your new running shoes and vice versa, your shoes have to adjust to your feet. Lace your shoes how you want them. Walk or lightly jog in them for a few days. If you’ve switched brands or tried a different style, add another day or two to ensure they’re the right fit. This gives your new running shoes and feet a chance to adjust to each other. During this time period, feel free to increase the amount of time spent walking or lightly jogging. If everything checks out then you’re good to increase your mileage! Ideally, you’ll break in your new running shoes within 4-7 days. 

#2 – Wear running socks

Wear running socks during the break-in process so you get a precise idea of how everything feels. When walking or lightly jogging, make sure everything fits and nothing on the shoe rubs uncomfortably. Nobody wants to get blisters or have a part of the shoe rub your skin raw during a run. If your old shoes are wearing out, chances are some of your socks are too. Look for signs like the material getting thinner or holes in the toes. 

#3 – Keep your old pair

Increase your mileage once your shoes are broken in.

You know it’s time for new running shoes when you reach a certain mileage, experience lower-body pain, or the shoe doesn’t respond like it once did. But don’t get rid of your older shoes just yet, they might have some mileage left on them. Keep running in your current pair while you break in your new kicks. Once the new pair is ready to go, alternate what you wear during your runs if your older pair isn’t quite ready for retirement. If they have some more life they can extend the life of your new pair. Once the older shoes have hit their mileage give them a new life as yard work shoes and what you wear when walking your dog.

Once you get used to your new running shoes you’ll notice the difference! Your run will feel more comfortable, the shoe’s responsiveness will be evident, and the new cushioning will reduce the impact on your joints, muscles, and bones. Make sure you give yourself plenty of time to break in your new running shoes before race day. After all, you bought them for the event and you’ll want to show them off!

Follow the 5 Fs of relay and start building your triathlon relay team

Triathlon is often a sport people become involved in as part of a life milestone or a personal goal. The discipline, training, and gear can be intimidating and overwhelming. But, there’s a less daunting entry point to triathlon for rookies. Build a triathlon relay team! The same applies to veterans who want to try longer distances or participate with friends and family. Building a triathlon relay team offers all of the race-day benefits with less training. Lindsey, CapTex Tri Ambassador, shared the following advice and explains why relay is the way to go. So read about the 5 Fs, share with your friends and family, and start building your triathlon relay team today. 

The 5 Fs of creating a triathlon relay team

  • Fun

Create a relay team and you’ll have more time to cheer for everyone else.

Triathlon is one of the most grueling, yet most fulfilling athletic accomplishments. Sometimes the “fun” is in the “done.” However, having raced the full distance and 6 relays as the bike leg, I love to relay. Race day feels more relaxed to me and I really love participating with friends or family. I have the ability to compete without having to hold back and extra time to cheer for everyone else! 

  • (F)Physical

The training required for three disciplines can be difficult and time-consuming. There might be bumps in the road due to physical limitations and/or injuries like these common foot problems triathletes experience. Perhaps you’re only comfortable with one or two disciplines due to your current skill level. Building a triathlon relay team is a great way to still race if instances like these occur. 

  • Family/friends

Make new triathlon memories with your relay team.

I’ve raced with both of my kids since they were 8 and 10 years old. A triathlon relay team is a great way to be directly involved in sports with them. Over the years, the experiences and friendships I’ve had in the triathlon community are unique to being a part of relay teams. It’s even better when you sign up to relay with friends at the last minute or introduce a family member to triathlon by having them complete the leg their most comfortable with. Pro tip: if you’re the swim leg, learn how to find swim goggles that are right for you.

  • Fitness

Those new to triathlon often go for long-distance races as their goal. Relay provides a low-risk opportunity to find out what distance is the best fit for you. When your first race is a long-distance tri, a bad day or a DNF (did not finish) can leave you with a bad experience after investing so much. Fitting in the time to properly train can be challenging, but specializing in one leg is less time-consuming. 

  • Finance

Save some cash when your team splits the event costs.

Triathlon is an investment of your time and finances. Joining a triathlon relay team is a great way to spend less time training and fewer dollars on gear, equipment, and coaching. Registration and travel can cost less when everything is split between the team. Gear costs could be cheaper when focusing on one discipline since you’re not purchasing items for swimming, cycling, and running. Additionally, joining a relay team can help first-timers learn about their new gear and become more comfortable with their discipline. Pro tip: if you’re the bike leg of your relay team, check out these bike buying dos and don’ts before you shop!

Triathlon has been a fun part of my life for eight years. Being on many triathlon relay teams has contributed to many of my great memories. I’ve seen it be a great opportunity for beginners to learn the sport or for veterans to introduce themselves to a new distance. As more people start swimming, cycling, and running to improve their health, creating a relay team is the best introduction to triathlon.