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Don’t let these common misconceptions about triathlon keep you from your next adventure

If you’re new to triathlons or can’t decide if you want to participate in one, it’s probably because you have some questions. We’re here to debunk common misconceptions about triathlons. With all the craziness of everyday life, adding triathlon training can seem nearly impossible. Whether you don’t have the time, resources, or you doubt your abilities, we are here to tell you that you can do it by breaking through these common misconceptions about triathlon.

It’s too expensive

The great thing about your first triathlon is you probably already have all the gear you would need! Let’s start with the basics. A swimsuit and goggles are all you need for the swim portion. We will provide you with a swim cap based on your age group and/or division. You may think you need an expensive racing bike, but any bike that will get you from A to B is just fine! If you don’t have a bike, that’s okay too – you can rent one or borrow one from a friend. Top it off with any bike helmet and you’re all set! For the run, you just need shoes, which you should already have. That’s it! You’re ready to tri. Pro tip: if you plan to buy a bike, make sure you follow our dos and don’ts of bike buying.

Training takes too much time

A sprint distance tri does not require as much training as you may think. Depending on your current swimming, cycling, and running abilities, you will know what areas you need to focus on. With that being said, you can train as little as 3 to 5 workouts a week (2 swims, 2 bikes, 1 run) to get you race-ready. Focus on your weakness and complete more of those workouts as needed. If your days are limited during the week, incorporate brick workouts and complete two disciplines in one day.

Must be a super athlete

Triathletes come in different ages, shapes, and sizes. If you can swim in a straight line, ride a bike, and put one foot in front of the other, you can complete a triathlon! According to USAT, the average age of triathletes is 38. The second-largest age group of participants is 40-44. It’s never too early or too late to start your tri journey. The Debra Zapata Sprint triathlon is ideal for beginner triathletes. It gives you a chance to get comfortable with the sport before attempting a long-distance race. Pro tip: learn about the different distances of triathlon.

Have to be able to swim, bike, and run

If you want to participate in a tri, but cannot complete one of the legs for any reason, you can still race! Get together a relay team of 2 to 3 people. You can divide up the work while still getting to experience a tri. We also have an Aquabike option available if you know you cannot complete the run portion.

You need a coach

There are endless options of free training plans online created by professional coaches for every distance triathlon. Once you find one, stick to the training plan and trust the process. Having a coach is great if you are trying to improve your time. But with all the resources out there, a coach is not necessary for your first tri. 

We’ve broken down common misconceptions about triathlon and now it’s time to get started. But before you do, read about other people’s first triathlons and learn about their experiences. High Five Events’ very own employees Laura, Tina, and William recount the experiences of their first triathlons, the good and the bad!

Saddle bag and essential items explained

It’s important to carry a saddle bag with you on all of your bike rides. You know this is true if you’ve ever had a flat tire or minor mechanical problem. A saddle bag is specifically designed to hang underneath your bicycle seat. They come in a variety of sizes and styles. Make sure yours fits comfortably on the back of your bike. Some people even have two different saddles bags, one for training rides and one for races. Check the links below to see some recommended items. Pro tip: follow the dos and don’ts of bike buying and make sure your saddle bag has what it needs.

At a minimum, it should have an inner tube, a patch kit, tire levers, and a bicycle-specific multi-tool in it. If you don’t know the size of your inner tube, check the sidewall of your tire. You could also ask your local bike shop what’s best for your bike. Pro tip: take care of your bike before issues arise with this helpful replacement timeline.

Fix a flat tire

Some cyclists carry a hand pump on their bike. If you don’t, it’s essential to have a CO2 cartridge and inflator. A flat tire can be fixed in less than five minutes. You can get back to riding if you have the tools and spare with you to fix it. Otherwise, you’ll be calling a friend for a ride or maybe calling in late to work if you’re mid-commute when the flat tire happens.

Other mechanical problems

A loose bolt could allow your handlebar to move or your seat to slip. Those two issues are an easy fix if your saddle bag has a bicycle-specific multi-tool. A broken chain is a less common occurrence. A chain tool is included in many multi-tools. It’s a necessity if your chain breaks while you’re out on a ride. You might want to consider carrying a “missing link” for any chain issues.

Learn how to change an inner tube or use a CO2 inflator. Talk to your mechanic or ask a friend to teach you how before your next long bike ride. Finally, you should always have a cell phone, some cash, and identification with you in case of an emergency. You don’t need to store those items in your saddle bag. The cash is useful on long bikes rides when you plan to stop at a gas station to refuel.

Follow these bike buying guidelines if you’re in the market

Buying a bike can be a massive undertaking. There are so many options, accessories, fits, shops, and questions. That’s where this bike buying advice can help! Follow these bike buying dos and don’ts to make sure you get the bike that’s just right for you. Our advice can simplify the process, whether this is your first bike or you’re upgrading. Pro tip: become familiar with the cycling rules of the road.

Dos 

Take the bike for a test ride

Many bike shops will allow you to take the bike out on an extended ride. So come prepared with clothes you can ride in.

Research bike types & have a clear goal for the bike 

There are different types of bikes and bike frame materials. Bikes that are specifically made for mountain biking are very different from traditional bikes. Aluminum and carbon fiber are the two most popular bike frame materials. There is no bike that does it all. Prioritize what is most important to you. 

Know what bike brands the store carries before you go 

Bike shops carry different types of brands. The city in which you live and the number of bike shops can determine what brands you have access to. Popular brands include Felt, Giant, Scott, Specialized, Trek, and Cervelo. Pro tip: whatever brand you get, learn how to refuel at a gas station during your long rides.

Talk to the staff and ask questions

TALK TO THE STAFF! Don’t be scared to talk to the folks in the shop, they are there to help. If you find that they go off on a tangent that you don’t follow just ask them to clarify. Many times they are just excited to talk about the bikes and are happy to share all of their knowledge. Getting to know them is also good. Having a relationship with the shop will be great when you come in to shop later or get service on your bike. 

Get the bike fitted to you

Bikes don’t come fit to you just off the rack. There are many things that can be adjusted to make the bike fit more comfortably and even optimize your performance on the bike. Things that can be adjusted include the stem of the bike, the seat post, the seat, crank arms, and more. While some shops include a basic fit with purchase, many times it costs extra since they bring in a professional to help. If the bike is something you are going to be putting a lot of hours on, it is totally worth the extra investment. Pro tip: learn how much of a difference an adjustment of a few millimeters can make with your saddle height.

Ask about any package deals or closeout specials

It’s not bad to ask if they offer any package deals on accessories. Many times they will give you a small discount on anything you buy at the time of the bike. Sometimes bike brands have closeout specials for last year’s bikes, as cars do. Pro tip: this blog breaks down the different hydration methods so you know what’s best for you.

Don’ts

Don’t test a bike at a shop, then buy online

Buying from a local shop is the start of a relationship. They are giving you their time and expertise, not just at the time of purchase but for years to come. 

Don’t ride just one bike

Be the Goldilocks of bike testing. If this is your first “real bike” take the time to test out different bikes. Different bike brands have different geometries that may fit your body better. 

Don’t settle for what’s in store

If all they have is the basic components model and you really wanted something nicer, don’t settle. See what they can do about getting the bike you want. If you don’t like the way a bike looks or it doesn’t fit quite right, don’t buy it just because you’re getting a great deal. There is not too much you can do about the color of bikes. Each year the model might be a different color. You can always see if there is an option to buy a previous or next year’s model. You can also have the bike custom painted if that is something that is important to you. 

Don’t skip on accessories

Get everything you need! Get lights, lock, bento box, water bottles, pedals, shoes, shorts, etc. Set yourself up for success so that you have everything you need to get out and ride. You don’t need the excuse of not having something to keep you from riding and enjoying your new bike. Plus, they may offer a discount on accessories at the time of purchase with your bike. 

Don’t buy and never return

Try and come back to the same bike shop for your future needs. They may even have a system that keeps track of your purchases so they are familiar with your needs. The mechanics at that shop will be most familiar with the brand and type of bike you purchased. You might just make some friends and new riding buddies.

Keep logging those miles with these motivational running tips

Whether you’re a seasoned runner or a first-timer you will face a time when you’re feeling too “blah” to run. Perhaps you’re too busy, too tired, or maybe feeling under the weather. You’re not alone! This is something that all triathletes experience. Breakthrough the excuse barrier with these 6 motivational running tips. It’ll keep your offseason training on track and you’ll be ready for the upcoming season.

Pro tip: always take time off from running to recover if you’re injured or sick. Most importantly, you should always listen to your body! Here are more helpful tips if you’ve started training for a triathlon.

  1. Call Your Running Partner

Having a running partner gives you the accountability factor. Running with another person is always fun because you can challenge each other. On days when you need a nudge, they can “talk” you into at least putting your running gear on and joining them for a few easy miles.

  1. Set a Shorter Running Goal

If you run 5K every day, reduce it to 2K on days where you’re not feeling it. You will trick your mind into believing that the run will be over soon. Chances are though, once you’re out there running, you’ll likely hit the 5K mark.

  1. Update Your Tunes

If you like to run while listening to music, maybe changing up the tunes will help. Sometimes we get bored listening to the same tunes, which can affect your passion for running. Choose “feel good” songs that inspire you, especially on gloomy days.

  1. Slow Down

Walking is an excellent alternative for getting fit. It’s okay if you’re not in the mood to run. Go for a brisk walk. This will get your heart pumping. It’s possible you might start jogging once you’re there!

  1. Revisit Your Goals

This is another form of self-accountability. If you are truly feeling a lack of inspiration towards running, take some time out and examine your fitness goals. What is it you want to achieve? Do you want to lose weight? Do you want to improve your cardiovascular fitness? Remind yourself about these goals and how meeting them will benefit you. Pro tip: these 10 mood-boosting quotes can help too!

  1. Change Your Route

Do you run the same route every day? Perhaps changing the course will stimulate your curiosity and inspire you to run. You’ll learn new routes, work muscles differently, and explore new sections of your city or neighborhood.

Keep in mind, it’s perfectly normal to not feel like running on a daily basis. Proper rest and recovery is just as important for your body as a short run. Give one of these 6 motivational running tips a try the next time you don’t feel like running. You’ll be glad you got out there when you finish!

Learn why every training plan should include brick workouts

Triathlon is an extensive physical competition that tests versatility in swimming, biking and running. Making brick workouts a part of your training can help you significantly improve your performance. A brick workout involves consecutive sessions of two triathlon activities, usually biking and running, in any order. This workout helps you develop the ability to complete one physical activity after another. It is an integral part of training for all training distances. Brick workouts help you prepare for swim-to-bike and bike-to-run transitions. Pro tip: test your nutrition and hydration plans during brick workouts and discover what works best for you.

Swim-to-bike

This is usually the first transition you make in a triathlon. When you pedal the bike after a period of swimming, the labor shifts from your arms to your legs, causing some discomfort. This discomfort is down to abruptly switching from a horizontal position while swimming to an upright position for cycling. So, for reducing the transition impact during the event, it is reasonable to do this brick.

If you are preparing for a Sprint or Super Sprint event, you can try a 200-300 m swim followed by cycling for 10- to 25-minutes. For Olympic distance, a swim session between 300 and 600 m with a 20-40 minute cycling period is ideal. Those prepping for Half Distance (70.3 mi) should aim to swim between 1000 m and 1500 m, along with 60 to 80 minutes of cycling. A brick session including 2000-2500 m of swimming and 145-210 minutes on the bike is suitable for Full Distance (140.6 mi) training. Make sure you have swim goggles that are just right for you.

Bike-to-run

It is probably the most common brick workout. It is also arguably the toughest because, after a period of biking, your legs feel heavy and are difficult to move. However, after getting a few brick sessions under your belt, your leg muscles shall start recovering well from the wear and tear of biking, letting you run easier.

For short distances like Super Sprint and Sprint, a 30- to 20-minute cycling session, followed by a 15-minute run is a good place to start. For Half and Full Distance triathlons, you can either cycle 60-80 mile & run for 20-30 minutes or cycle 30-60 mile & run for 45-90 minutes.

Run-to-bike

Although you are not likely to face a run-to-bike transition in a triathlon, this brick certainly helps you build endurance and stamina. This is especially useful for duathlons which include a run-to-bike transition followed by a final run.

A 10- to 20-minute run, in build-up to a 30- to 120-minute cycling session, is preferable for Olympic distance and less. In case you are training for anything beyond Olympic distance, a 20-minute run followed by cycling for 75 to 120 minutes is fairly competitive. Learn how you can refuel at gas stations for your longer bike rides.

What are the different triathlon distances? We cover the basics to help you choose the right one for you

A triathlon is a sports event that rewards your grit, stamina, and endurance. It is a comprehensive competition which includes swimming, cycling, and running. A triathlon is obviously challenging, but you can do well with proper training and a positive mentality.

When you hear triathlon, you might think of mass swims and endurance professionals racing in a full distance triathlon – Ironman – which involves a 2.4 mile swim and 112-mile bike ride before culminating in a 26.2 marathon run. It is a common misconception that is all triathlons can be.

In fact, there are many different triathlon distances, with most of them being very beginner-friendly.

An important factor that determines its difficulty is the distance to be covered. Knowing the distance implications of various triathlons helps you choose the right one for yourself and prepare for it accordingly. Let us look at different triathlon distances.

Super sprint

Super sprint triathlon is a shorter distance sprint triathlon. This distance event usually covers a total distance usually of about 8 miles (3 km). It is perfect for those who want a taste of what triathlon is all about.  The distance breakup can vary greatly in this distance but is usually is 300 to 500 m of swimming, 10 km (6.2 miles) of cycling, and 2-3 miles of running. Despite being considered a beginner’s triathlon because of the short distance, it can be just as tough for veterans that want to see their max speed. 

Sprint

For beginners who have some previous experience and want to take it up a notch, a sprint triathlon is a logical progression after a super sprint. This is one of the most popular distances for triathlons. This distance can vary greatly as well. So be sure to check the specifics when researching triathlons in your area. A sprint triathlon is usually about a total of 15-25 miles. An example of a sprint triathlon distance is a 500m Swim, 14.5 mile Bike, 5 Km Run.

Taking part in a sprint triathlon is a great way to check how your training is going when you are training for a longer distance. Participating in a sprint 6-4 months before an Olympic or Half Distance is a great way to practice and test your race tactics.

Standard/International/Quarter/ Olympic

The name gives away the increased difficulty that comes with this triathlon. This event distance took on the name Olympic after triathlon joined the Olympic Games in 2000. With an overall distance of around 32 miles (51.5 km), this triathlon requires you to exhibit a higher endurance level. It comprises 1500 m (0.9 mile) of swimming, 40 km (24.8 miles) of cycling, followed by 10 km (6.2 miles) of running. 

Training for an Olympic takes significantly more time and planning. There are usually race cut off times at these events, meaning knowing your pace is very important.

Half Distance/ 70.3

Half distance triathlons have become increasingly popular over the years. This 70.3 mile-long strenuous physical course involves covering 1930 m (1.2 miles) in water, 90 km (56 miles) on the bike, and 21 km (13.1 miles) on foot.

Racing a half distance is very obtainable with a structured training program. Half distances can take up to 8.5 hours to complete. Athletes racing in these longer distance events should also pay attention to on-course support and have a nutrition plan. A 70.3 distance is great for athletes that want to focus on endurance over speed. Just like with moving up from a sprint to Olympic, racing a half distance as part of your full distance training is a great idea.

Full Distance

If half distance is not enough for you, you can double the distance by participating in a full distance triathlon. This is commonly associated with the Ironman brand but there are tons of awesome events that offer a full distance triathlon. Covering 140.6 miles (a little over 226 km), a full iron triathlon is extremely tough, even for veterans. It requires you to swim for 3900 m (2.4 miles), cycle for 180 km (112 miles), and run for 42.2 km (26.2 miles).

Athletes racing the 140.6 distance should invest in more specialized equipment like a triathlon bike and potentially a wetsuit. The training regimen for a full distance is much longer and requires a dedicated schedule.

Ultra

From double triathlon to decuple triathlon, every version that exceeds full distance triathlon falls in the ultra category. These triathlons can stretch over a number of days. The most-demanding forms of triathlon fall in this group.

These distances can be seen as milestones for you to reach over your triathlon career. Choosing the most suitable distance, as per your ability and experience, can prove crucial to how you perform in the competition. Make sure to pick a distance that doesn’t push you too much and that you can enjoy it.

Infographic showing the different triathlon distance that are explained within the blog

Think you can skip training for the swim for your next tri? Not so fast!

You’re an ok swimmer so you don’t feel like you should allot a bunch of time training for the swim. Fast forward to the morning of your tri, add in race day elements – open water, other athletes, and no lanes to keep you in check – it’s no wonder why even seasoned triathletes may face panic during the swim. Know the importance of swim training with 5 reasons why you shouldn’t ignore swim training for your upcoming triathlon.5 Reasons You Shouldn't Ignore Your Swim Training

1. Helps Prevent Injury

Getting your body accustomed to handle the first leg of the tri is crucial. Swimming is a low-intensity, low-impact workout that will improve your overall flexibility, heart and lung capacity. Developing this during your training will prevent any unexpected incidents on race day. Train for the distance you are going to swim in your upcoming tri. Start slow and work your way up to this distance during your workouts. You can always slow down and take it easy on the bike and run legs, but during the intensity and commotion of the swim, your options are limited. For safety reasons, you cannot complete the race if you are unable to complete the swim portion. Therefore, you should practice floating on your back and practice a safety stroke as a backup plan if you start to feel tired or get frantic during the swim.

2. Avoid Swimming Further Than You Have To

5 Reasons You Shouldnt Ignore Your Swim Training

For those who have done most of your training in a pool, you are used to having a guide to keep you swimming in a straight line. If you don’t practice sighting during your training, you’ll most likely end up zig-zagging between the buoys, thus adding to the distance you have to swim on race morning. Don’t count on following the person in front of you. Sight regularly throughout the swim course to make sure you stay on the correct side of the buoys. Practicing sighting is key to avoid swimming off course during your tri.

3. Good Cardiovascular Activity

Swimming is a great aerobic exercise that will improve your cardiovascular fitness and overall health. It’s easy on your joints and is a perfect low-impact cardio exercise that can help reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. Choose a training plan that focuses on improving your swim technique to reserve your energy for the remaining legs of the race.  Also, establishing a good technique before the race will make you more efficient in the water on race day.

4. Strengthen Your Legs

Leg strength can make or break a race, so don’t make the mistake of neglecting leg work in the pool. If you haven’t spent much time in the water during your training, your legs may feel weak after completing the swim portion. To avoid feeling weak throughout the bike and run portion, use various swimming workouts to strengthen your legs during your training. The resistance from the water will strengthen your legs more than running or cycling alone. Incorporate kick sets into your swim training plan to ensure you have trained for your distance properly.  Pro tip: As you near the exit swim, start kicking your legs a little stronger to get the blood circulating into your legs again to prepare for the run into transition.

5. Calm Pre-Race Nerves

5 Reasons You Shouldn't Ignore Your Swim Training

Despite all your training, things can go awry when you factor in hundreds of other athletes into the mix. Nerves on race morning can get pretty overwhelming. Especially if this is your first triathlon. Even with a time trial start, swimming with so many people of all different skill levels can unnerve a highly skilled swimmer. You need to build your confidence in the water before the race. Most training takes place in a pool, but try joining a local tri club or a Masters Swimming Program to get the experience of swimming in open water with other athletes. Pro tip: Get out and do a mock swim so there are no surprises for your open-water swim.

It is common for athletes to dread the first discipline of a tri. Preparing for this during your training will eliminate any uncertainties you have before you dive into the swim start.  Whether you’re a novice swimmer or trying to go from a good swimmer to a great swimmer, training is key to a good performance on race day. So don’t hurt yourself by ignoring swim training for your upcoming tri! Grab your gear and head to the water.

A record number of triathletes, more than 1800, registered for The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including this female sprint finisher posting in front of the Kerrville Tri sign.

Congrats to all the 2019 Kerrville Tri finishers!

More than 4000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to Kerrville, Texas, for the 9th annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival. A record number of triathletes, more than 1800, (most in event history) registered for the Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas. Participants gave their all on a course highlighted by swimming in Nimitz Lake, cycling through the Texas Hill Country, and running along the Guadalupe River. Participants were treated to fajitas, cold beer, snacks, and an opportunity to recover in the refreshing waters of the Guadalupe River after crossing the finish line. Kerrville Tri also launched best pricing for 2020, which ends on Tuesday, Oct. 8th.

“This is my favorite race and the course is beautiful,” said Meredith Townley, who completed the quarter distance (3:22:07) on Sunday. “I love the hometown feel that Kerrville and the Hill Country provide and how everyone – vendors, sponsors, spectators, etc. – truly supports everyone else!” 

The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including these triathletes floating the Guadalupe River in their Kerrville Tri floats!

Participants float the Guadalupe River after crossing the 2019 Kerrville Tri finish line!

The family-friendly Kerrville Triathlon Festival took place from Friday, September 27th, to Sunday, September 29th. It featured two days of triathlon action and a bustling two-day expo. Six different events were featured, sprint, quarter, half, aquabike, relays, and a kids fun run. The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint relay, and kids fun run took place on Saturday. All other events, including the quarter and the half, took place on Sunday. Before the action began, participants, volunteers, and friends and family went to the annual Friday night Kerrville Tri Mixer. Inn of the Hills, the host hotel, hosted the Mixer and the expo and packet pick up. Grammy award-winning artist and Debra Zapata sprint participant Shawn Colvin sang Saturday’s national anthem.

“I love registering for and completing an affordable half distance triathlon in the Texas Hill Country,” said Michelle Bonathan, Kerrville Triathlon half distance open division female champion (5:22:50). “The support and energy from the spectators and volunteers were top-notch!”

Peter Murray (1:02:01), of Austin, Texas, won Saturday’s sprint event. Marla Briley (1:14:23), of Austin, Texas, won the female division. Sunday’s winners and their times follow: quarter – female winner, Jami O’Toole (2:34:38), male winner, Mark Saroni (2:03:20); half – female winner, Michelle Bonathan, male winner, Jack Cartwright (4:53:58). Results for Saturday and Sunday are available. 

Perks for record number of triathletes

A record number of triathletes registered for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon, including these future triathletes at the free kids fun run.

The kids take off at the free kids fun run!

New for 2019, participants received a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float and recovered in the Guadalupe River after crossing the finish line. Athletes received a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative hat. They also received a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. They enjoyed a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, snacks, and the ever-popular beer garden. The event also had professional timing and photography. A great volunteer crew, thousands of supportive spectators, and an electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. Photos can be found on the Kerrville Triathlon Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds in addition to the website.

The Kerrville Triathlon would like to thank sponsors H-E-B, City Limit Cycles, the City of Kerrville, Kerrville Fire Department, Kerrville Police Department, Kerr County Sheriff’s Department, Kerrville Convention and Visitors Bureau, Peterson Health, Jack and Adam’s Fredericksburg, SPIbelt, Peak Fitness, MO-RANCH, Hill Country Bicycle Works, Grape Juice, Mamacita’s, Camp Gladiator, and Gatorade.

The largest field in event history consists of triathletes from 17 different states

High Five Events concludes their 2019 triathlon season with the largest field in Kerrville Triathlon Festival history. More than 1800 athletes have registered for this beloved Hill Country event. The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas features a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and a run course along the Guadalupe River. The ninth annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival will take place on September 27-29, in Kerrville, Texas. The final price increase occurs tonight, Monday, September 23rd, at 11:59.

Image of custom float all Kerrville Triathlon participants will receive! They're part of the largest field in event history.“I’ve heard great things about Kerrville Triathlon, from it’s scenic course to the big party at the finish line festival,” said Bryan Deibel of Austin, Texas, who is registered for Saturday’s Debra Zapata Sprint. “I’m even more pumped to float the Guadalupe River after my sprint in my Kerrville Tri-branded float!”

Perks for Kerrville Triathlon participants

New for 2019, all participants will receive a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float so they can recover in the Guadalupe River near the finish line festival. Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative trucker hat. They’ll also get a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. Once they cross the finish line, triathletes can enjoy a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, snacks, beer garden, and an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Professional timing and photography, a great volunteer crew, hundreds of supportive spectators, and an electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. 

“We’re excited about Kerrville Tri’s largest field ever and ready to welcome triathletes from all over to the Texas Hill Country,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “When you combine the three-day-long festival with the beauty of the Texas Hill Country you can see why Kerrville Tri is a true destination triathlon.”

Registration is still open

Current pricing for all events follows: Debra Zapata Sprint ($105), sprint aquabike ($105), sprint relay ($165), quarter ($155), quarter aquabike ($155), half ($245), half aquabike ($245), half relay ($295), kids fun run (free), Virtual Kerrville Triathlon, which can be associated with any distance ($45). 

The Debra Zapata Sprint distance triathlon, sprint aquabike, sprint relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 28th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 29th. Participants can pick up their packet at the Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup. The expo is located at the host hotel, Inn of the Hills. The expo and packet pickup, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Friday, Sept. 27th, and Saturday, Sept. 28th. Participants can see the entire pricing structure and register on the website.

A couple of hundred spots remain as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas nears sellout

Friends pose before the 2018 Kerrville Triathlon. The 2019 edition nears sellout.

Tell your friends to register before Kerrville Tri sells out!

Excitement for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon Festival continues to build as registration numbers continue their historic climb. The beloved destination triathlon has a limited amount of spots remaining as it nears a sellout. Last year, more than 2000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to the Texas Hill Country. The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas features a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and run course along the Guadalupe River. The 9th annual Kerrville Triathlon Festival will take place on September 27-29, in Kerrville, Texas.

“My wife and I both love Kerrville Tri, we’re racing and volunteering again this year,” said Mark Wignall, who has participated in the Kerrville Tri for the past three years. “The entire course is beautiful and it’s a short drive from Austin and San Antonio, making it the perfect destination event.”

Branded floats for all

New for 2019, all participants will receive a Kerrville Triathlon-branded float so they can recover in the Guadalupe River near the finish line festival. Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, and commemorative trucker hat. They’ll also get a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. Once they cross the finish line, triathletes can enjoy a free post-race meal including fajitas from H-E-B, fruit, and snacks. They will also enjoy the beer garden and have an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Kerrville Tri features professional timing and photography. Participants can draw energy from a great volunteer crew and hundreds of supportive spectators. An electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. 

“An increasing number of triathletes are hearing what we’ve known for nearly a decade, Kerrville Tri is The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “When you combine the three-day-long festival with the beauty of the Texas Hill Country you can see why Kerrville Tri is a true destination triathlon.”

Limited amount of Kerrville Tri spots remain

Current pricing for all events follows: Debra Zapata Sprint ($105), sprint aquabike ($105), sprint relay ($165), quarter ($155), quarter aquabike ($155), half ($245), half aquabike ($245), half relay ($295), kids fun run (free), Virtual Kerrville Triathlon, which can be associated with any distance ($45). 

The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint aquabike, sprint relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 28th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 29th. The Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup will take place at the host hotel, Inn of the Hills. The expo and packet pickup, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Friday, Sept. 27th, and Saturday, Sept. 28th. Participants can see the entire pricing structure and register on the website.