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Don’t let these common misconceptions about triathlon keep you from your next adventure

If you’re new to triathlons or can’t decide if you want to participate in one, it’s probably because you have some questions. We’re here to debunk common misconceptions about triathlons. With all the craziness of everyday life, adding triathlon training can seem nearly impossible. Whether you don’t have the time, resources, or you doubt your abilities, we are here to tell you that you can do it by breaking through these common misconceptions about triathlon.

It’s too expensive

The great thing about your first triathlon is you probably already have all the gear you would need! Let’s start with the basics. A swimsuit and goggles are all you need for the swim portion. We will provide you with a swim cap based on your age group and/or division. You may think you need an expensive racing bike, but any bike that will get you from A to B is just fine! If you don’t have a bike, that’s okay too – you can rent one or borrow one from a friend. Top it off with any bike helmet and you’re all set! For the run, you just need shoes, which you should already have. That’s it! You’re ready to tri. Pro tip: if you plan to buy a bike, make sure you follow our dos and don’ts of bike buying.

Training takes too much time

A sprint distance tri does not require as much training as you may think. Depending on your current swimming, cycling, and running abilities, you will know what areas you need to focus on. With that being said, you can train as little as 3 to 5 workouts a week (2 swims, 2 bikes, 1 run) to get you race-ready. Focus on your weakness and complete more of those workouts as needed. If your days are limited during the week, incorporate brick workouts and complete two disciplines in one day.

Must be a super athlete

Triathletes come in different ages, shapes, and sizes. If you can swim in a straight line, ride a bike, and put one foot in front of the other, you can complete a triathlon! According to USAT, the average age of triathletes is 38. The second-largest age group of participants is 40-44. It’s never too early or too late to start your tri journey. The Debra Zapata Sprint triathlon is ideal for beginner triathletes. It gives you a chance to get comfortable with the sport before attempting a long-distance race. Pro tip: learn about the different distances of triathlon.

Have to be able to swim, bike, and run

If you want to participate in a tri, but cannot complete one of the legs for any reason, you can still race! Get together a relay team of 2 to 3 people. You can divide up the work while still getting to experience a tri. We also have an Aquabike option available if you know you cannot complete the run portion.

You need a coach

There are endless options of free training plans online created by professional coaches for every distance triathlon. Once you find one, stick to the training plan and trust the process. Having a coach is great if you are trying to improve your time. But with all the resources out there, a coach is not necessary for your first tri. 

We’ve broken down common misconceptions about triathlon and now it’s time to get started. But before you do, read about other people’s first triathlons and learn about their experiences. High Five Events’ very own employees Laura, Tina, and William recount the experiences of their first triathlons, the good and the bad!

You don’t want to miss these inspirational sports movies and documentaries on Netflix

Everyone can use a motivational boost every once in a while! Netflix has several sports movies and documentaries which can lift your mood any day. The list below is perfect for your next rest day. You can also click play before your next long ride on the indoor trainer. Follow this helpful guide to get set up on Zwift. You just might have your best training ride! Here is a list of our top inspirational sports movies and documentaries. Pro tip: watch one of these for an extra boost before your next brick workout.

100 Meters

100 Meters is a Spanish movie about a man who tries to compete in an Iron Man race. Despite suffering from multiple sclerosis, he defies odds by training for the triathlon race with help from his father-in-law.

Rising Phoenix

A recent documentary, Rising Phoenix captures the lives of nine athletes and their respective journeys in the Paralympic Games. This movie informs viewers’ understanding of specially gifted individuals and their athletic talents.

Lorena, Light-Footed Woman

Looking for a woman-centric sports documentary? This inspiring story is of Lorena Ramirez who gives up her pastoral existence to participate in ultramarathons by wearing sandals. It is a must-watch for all female sports enthusiasts.

Lucha: Playing the Impossible

This documentary is an inspiration for all aspiring sportswomen. The performance of Luciana Aymar, a player on the Argentinian women’s hockey team, is noticed by players, coaches, and fans across the globe. Lucha eventually puts her country’s hockey team under the international spotlight when she becomes one of only two women from Argentina to win four Olympic medals.

Bobby Robson: More Than a Manager

Featuring British coach Sir Bobby Robson, this movie depicts the manager who garnered respect for his polite demeanor in the football field. Robson is credited for building the careers of many football players like Jose Mourinho, Terry Butcher, Paul Gascoigne, and Pep Guardiola. The story shows how as a manager he led his team away from political issues and helped them attain success.

A Life of Speed: The Juan Manuel Fangio Story

A Life of Speed is the tale of Juan Manuel Fangio who rose from humble beginnings as a mechanic’s son and became a well-known racing car champion. The story gives viewers a glimpse into the risky profession of motor car racing and shows one man who defeated circumstances to win five world titles on some of the most challenging tasks.

Dangal

Dangal is a biographical story of a former wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat who trains his two daughters to win at the Commonwealth Games. Phogat successfully leads his children to victory by overcoming gender stereotypes and other challenges. A must watch for those interested in women’s empowerment in the sports realm.

Feel like you need more of a boost? Add these 10 quotes and 6 running tips to the mix!

Kick things up a notch when you add these songs to your running playlist

Click refresh on your running playlist when you add these 5 songs. Your running playlist will never be the same! Strategically place them so the energy boost arrives right when you need it most. The right song can work wonders when you need an extra boost. Updating your running playlist is an excellent motivational running tip. Check out this blog for 5 more motivational tips!

Sunny Came Home – Shawn Colvin

Shawn sang the National Anthem at the 2018 and ‘19 Kerrville Triathlon before competing! The calming demeanor of this song will help you relax on long runs and recovery runs. Plus, it won two Grammys.

Knights of Cydonia – Muse

Need some audio energy? Put this song on your playlist. It’s roughly 6 minutes of hard-hitting, fight-the-establishment, in-your-face rock and roll. Click play and buckle up!

Born This Way – Lady Gaga

Prepare to skip the warm-up if your running playlist kicks things off with this song. Get ready to get moving when you click play because you were born this way!

Fly Farm Blues – Jack White

When new school goes old school. When this song first comes on you might think it’s an oldie, but just wait. The electricity pours out and will energize you on your run!

Fancy – Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Keep the energy going with this back-and-forth ballad. The drums and guitar take turns while you keep pushing forward, one step at a time.

Add these songs to your running playlist before your next run. They can pump you up, allow you to catch your breath, or help you focus on the warm-up/cool-down. These songs are the perfect way to get you going during the run portion of your brick workout. However you incorporate music, just make sure you can still hear your surroundings. It’s important to know what’s going on around you!

Saddle bag and essential items explained

It’s important to carry a saddle bag with you on all of your bike rides. You know this is true if you’ve ever had a flat tire or minor mechanical problem. A saddle bag is specifically designed to hang underneath your bicycle seat. They come in a variety of sizes and styles. Make sure yours fits comfortably on the back of your bike. Some people even have two different saddles bags, one for training rides and one for races. Check the links below to see some recommended items. Pro tip: follow the dos and don’ts of bike buying and make sure your saddle bag has what it needs.

At a minimum, it should have an inner tube, a patch kit, tire levers, and a bicycle-specific multi-tool in it. If you don’t know the size of your inner tube, check the sidewall of your tire. You could also ask your local bike shop what’s best for your bike. Pro tip: take care of your bike before issues arise with this helpful replacement timeline.

Fix a flat tire

Some cyclists carry a hand pump on their bike. If you don’t, it’s essential to have a CO2 cartridge and inflator. A flat tire can be fixed in less than five minutes. You can get back to riding if you have the tools and spare with you to fix it. Otherwise, you’ll be calling a friend for a ride or maybe calling in late to work if you’re mid-commute when the flat tire happens.

Other mechanical problems

A loose bolt could allow your handlebar to move or your seat to slip. Those two issues are an easy fix if your saddle bag has a bicycle-specific multi-tool. A broken chain is a less common occurrence. A chain tool is included in many multi-tools. It’s a necessity if your chain breaks while you’re out on a ride. You might want to consider carrying a “missing link” for any chain issues.

Learn how to change an inner tube or use a CO2 inflator. Talk to your mechanic or ask a friend to teach you how before your next long bike ride. Finally, you should always have a cell phone, some cash, and identification with you in case of an emergency. You don’t need to store those items in your saddle bag. The cash is useful on long bikes rides when you plan to stop at a gas station to refuel.

Follow these bike buying guidelines if you’re in the market

Buying a bike can be a massive undertaking. There are so many options, accessories, fits, shops, and questions. That’s where this bike buying advice can help! Follow these bike buying dos and don’ts to make sure you get the bike that’s just right for you. Our advice can simplify the process, whether this is your first bike or you’re upgrading. Pro tip: become familiar with the cycling rules of the road.

Dos 

Take the bike for a test ride

Many bike shops will allow you to take the bike out on an extended ride. So come prepared with clothes you can ride in.

Research bike types & have a clear goal for the bike 

There are different types of bikes and bike frame materials. Bikes that are specifically made for mountain biking are very different from traditional bikes. Aluminum and carbon fiber are the two most popular bike frame materials. There is no bike that does it all. Prioritize what is most important to you. 

Know what bike brands the store carries before you go 

Bike shops carry different types of brands. The city in which you live and the number of bike shops can determine what brands you have access to. Popular brands include Felt, Giant, Scott, Specialized, Trek, and Cervelo. Pro tip: whatever brand you get, learn how to refuel at a gas station during your long rides.

Talk to the staff and ask questions

TALK TO THE STAFF! Don’t be scared to talk to the folks in the shop, they are there to help. If you find that they go off on a tangent that you don’t follow just ask them to clarify. Many times they are just excited to talk about the bikes and are happy to share all of their knowledge. Getting to know them is also good. Having a relationship with the shop will be great when you come in to shop later or get service on your bike. 

Get the bike fitted to you

Bikes don’t come fit to you just off the rack. There are many things that can be adjusted to make the bike fit more comfortably and even optimize your performance on the bike. Things that can be adjusted include the stem of the bike, the seat post, the seat, crank arms, and more. While some shops include a basic fit with purchase, many times it costs extra since they bring in a professional to help. If the bike is something you are going to be putting a lot of hours on, it is totally worth the extra investment. Pro tip: learn how much of a difference an adjustment of a few millimeters can make with your saddle height.

Ask about any package deals or closeout specials

It’s not bad to ask if they offer any package deals on accessories. Many times they will give you a small discount on anything you buy at the time of the bike. Sometimes bike brands have closeout specials for last year’s bikes, as cars do. Pro tip: this blog breaks down the different hydration methods so you know what’s best for you.

Don’ts

Don’t test a bike at a shop, then buy online

Buying from a local shop is the start of a relationship. They are giving you their time and expertise, not just at the time of purchase but for years to come. 

Don’t ride just one bike

Be the Goldilocks of bike testing. If this is your first “real bike” take the time to test out different bikes. Different bike brands have different geometries that may fit your body better. 

Don’t settle for what’s in store

If all they have is the basic components model and you really wanted something nicer, don’t settle. See what they can do about getting the bike you want. If you don’t like the way a bike looks or it doesn’t fit quite right, don’t buy it just because you’re getting a great deal. There is not too much you can do about the color of bikes. Each year the model might be a different color. You can always see if there is an option to buy a previous or next year’s model. You can also have the bike custom painted if that is something that is important to you. 

Don’t skip on accessories

Get everything you need! Get lights, lock, bento box, water bottles, pedals, shoes, shorts, etc. Set yourself up for success so that you have everything you need to get out and ride. You don’t need the excuse of not having something to keep you from riding and enjoying your new bike. Plus, they may offer a discount on accessories at the time of purchase with your bike. 

Don’t buy and never return

Try and come back to the same bike shop for your future needs. They may even have a system that keeps track of your purchases so they are familiar with your needs. The mechanics at that shop will be most familiar with the brand and type of bike you purchased. You might just make some friends and new riding buddies.

Keep logging those miles with these motivational running tips

Whether you’re a seasoned runner or a first-timer you will face a time when you’re feeling too “blah” to run. Perhaps you’re too busy, too tired, or maybe feeling under the weather. You’re not alone! This is something that all triathletes experience. Breakthrough the excuse barrier with these 6 motivational running tips. It’ll keep your offseason training on track and you’ll be ready for the upcoming season.

Pro tip: always take time off from running to recover if you’re injured or sick. Most importantly, you should always listen to your body! Here are more helpful tips if you’ve started training for a triathlon.

  1. Call Your Running Partner

Having a running partner gives you the accountability factor. Running with another person is always fun because you can challenge each other. On days when you need a nudge, they can “talk” you into at least putting your running gear on and joining them for a few easy miles.

  1. Set a Shorter Running Goal

If you run 5K every day, reduce it to 2K on days where you’re not feeling it. You will trick your mind into believing that the run will be over soon. Chances are though, once you’re out there running, you’ll likely hit the 5K mark.

  1. Update Your Tunes

If you like to run while listening to music, maybe changing up the tunes will help. Sometimes we get bored listening to the same tunes, which can affect your passion for running. Choose “feel good” songs that inspire you, especially on gloomy days.

  1. Slow Down

Walking is an excellent alternative for getting fit. It’s okay if you’re not in the mood to run. Go for a brisk walk. This will get your heart pumping. It’s possible you might start jogging once you’re there!

  1. Revisit Your Goals

This is another form of self-accountability. If you are truly feeling a lack of inspiration towards running, take some time out and examine your fitness goals. What is it you want to achieve? Do you want to lose weight? Do you want to improve your cardiovascular fitness? Remind yourself about these goals and how meeting them will benefit you. Pro tip: these 10 mood-boosting quotes can help too!

  1. Change Your Route

Do you run the same route every day? Perhaps changing the course will stimulate your curiosity and inspire you to run. You’ll learn new routes, work muscles differently, and explore new sections of your city or neighborhood.

Keep in mind, it’s perfectly normal to not feel like running on a daily basis. Proper rest and recovery is just as important for your body as a short run. Give one of these 6 motivational running tips a try the next time you don’t feel like running. You’ll be glad you got out there when you finish!

Learn why every training plan should include brick workouts

Triathlon is an extensive physical competition that tests versatility in swimming, biking and running. Making brick workouts a part of your training can help you significantly improve your performance. A brick workout involves consecutive sessions of two triathlon activities, usually biking and running, in any order. This workout helps you develop the ability to complete one physical activity after another. It is an integral part of training for all training distances. Brick workouts help you prepare for swim-to-bike and bike-to-run transitions. Pro tip: test your nutrition and hydration plans during brick workouts and discover what works best for you.

Swim-to-bike

This is usually the first transition you make in a triathlon. When you pedal the bike after a period of swimming, the labor shifts from your arms to your legs, causing some discomfort. This discomfort is down to abruptly switching from a horizontal position while swimming to an upright position for cycling. So, for reducing the transition impact during the event, it is reasonable to do this brick.

If you are preparing for a Sprint or Super Sprint event, you can try a 200-300 m swim followed by cycling for 10- to 25-minutes. For Olympic distance, a swim session between 300 and 600 m with a 20-40 minute cycling period is ideal. Those prepping for Half Distance (70.3 mi) should aim to swim between 1000 m and 1500 m, along with 60 to 80 minutes of cycling. A brick session including 2000-2500 m of swimming and 145-210 minutes on the bike is suitable for Full Distance (140.6 mi) training. Make sure you have swim goggles that are just right for you.

Bike-to-run

It is probably the most common brick workout. It is also arguably the toughest because, after a period of biking, your legs feel heavy and are difficult to move. However, after getting a few brick sessions under your belt, your leg muscles shall start recovering well from the wear and tear of biking, letting you run easier.

For short distances like Super Sprint and Sprint, a 30- to 20-minute cycling session, followed by a 15-minute run is a good place to start. For Half and Full Distance triathlons, you can either cycle 60-80 mile & run for 20-30 minutes or cycle 30-60 mile & run for 45-90 minutes.

Run-to-bike

Although you are not likely to face a run-to-bike transition in a triathlon, this brick certainly helps you build endurance and stamina. This is especially useful for duathlons which include a run-to-bike transition followed by a final run.

A 10- to 20-minute run, in build-up to a 30- to 120-minute cycling session, is preferable for Olympic distance and less. In case you are training for anything beyond Olympic distance, a 20-minute run followed by cycling for 75 to 120 minutes is fairly competitive. Learn how you can refuel at gas stations for your longer bike rides.

What are the different triathlon distances? We cover the basics to help you choose the right one for you

A triathlon is a sports event that rewards your grit, stamina, and endurance. It is a comprehensive competition which includes swimming, cycling, and running. A triathlon is obviously challenging, but you can do well with proper training and a positive mentality.

When you hear triathlon, you might think of mass swims and endurance professionals racing in a full distance triathlon – Ironman – which involves a 2.4 mile swim and 112-mile bike ride before culminating in a 26.2 marathon run. It is a common misconception that is all triathlons can be.

In fact, there are many different triathlon distances, with most of them being very beginner-friendly.

An important factor that determines its difficulty is the distance to be covered. Knowing the distance implications of various triathlons helps you choose the right one for yourself and prepare for it accordingly. Let us look at different triathlon distances.

Super sprint

Super sprint triathlon is a shorter distance sprint triathlon. This distance event usually covers a total distance usually of about 8 miles (3 km). It is perfect for those who want a taste of what triathlon is all about.  The distance breakup can vary greatly in this distance but is usually is 300 to 500 m of swimming, 10 km (6.2 miles) of cycling, and 2-3 miles of running. Despite being considered a beginner’s triathlon because of the short distance, it can be just as tough for veterans that want to see their max speed. 

Sprint

For beginners who have some previous experience and want to take it up a notch, a sprint triathlon is a logical progression after a super sprint. This is one of the most popular distances for triathlons. This distance can vary greatly as well. So be sure to check the specifics when researching triathlons in your area. A sprint triathlon is usually about a total of 15-25 miles. An example of a sprint triathlon distance is a 500m Swim, 14.5 mile Bike, 5 Km Run.

Taking part in a sprint triathlon is a great way to check how your training is going when you are training for a longer distance. Participating in a sprint 6-4 months before an Olympic or Half Distance is a great way to practice and test your race tactics.

Standard/International/Quarter/ Olympic

The name gives away the increased difficulty that comes with this triathlon. This event distance took on the name Olympic after triathlon joined the Olympic Games in 2000. With an overall distance of around 32 miles (51.5 km), this triathlon requires you to exhibit a higher endurance level. It comprises 1500 m (0.9 mile) of swimming, 40 km (24.8 miles) of cycling, followed by 10 km (6.2 miles) of running. 

Training for an Olympic takes significantly more time and planning. There are usually race cut off times at these events, meaning knowing your pace is very important.

Half Distance/ 70.3

Half distance triathlons have become increasingly popular over the years. This 70.3 mile-long strenuous physical course involves covering 1930 m (1.2 miles) in water, 90 km (56 miles) on the bike, and 21 km (13.1 miles) on foot.

Racing a half distance is very obtainable with a structured training program. Half distances can take up to 8.5 hours to complete. Athletes racing in these longer distance events should also pay attention to on-course support and have a nutrition plan. A 70.3 distance is great for athletes that want to focus on endurance over speed. Just like with moving up from a sprint to Olympic, racing a half distance as part of your full distance training is a great idea.

Full Distance

If half distance is not enough for you, you can double the distance by participating in a full distance triathlon. This is commonly associated with the Ironman brand but there are tons of awesome events that offer a full distance triathlon. Covering 140.6 miles (a little over 226 km), a full iron triathlon is extremely tough, even for veterans. It requires you to swim for 3900 m (2.4 miles), cycle for 180 km (112 miles), and run for 42.2 km (26.2 miles).

Athletes racing the 140.6 distance should invest in more specialized equipment like a triathlon bike and potentially a wetsuit. The training regimen for a full distance is much longer and requires a dedicated schedule.

Ultra

From double triathlon to decuple triathlon, every version that exceeds full distance triathlon falls in the ultra category. These triathlons can stretch over a number of days. The most-demanding forms of triathlon fall in this group.

These distances can be seen as milestones for you to reach over your triathlon career. Choosing the most suitable distance, as per your ability and experience, can prove crucial to how you perform in the competition. Make sure to pick a distance that doesn’t push you too much and that you can enjoy it.

Infographic showing the different triathlon distance that are explained within the blog

2020 Kerrville Triathlon Festival canceled

Thank you for registering for the 2020 Kerrville Triathlon Festival. We have an update concerning this year’s event scheduled for September 26-27, 2020. Unfortunately, we have been forced to cancel the 2020 Kerrville Tri as a result of mandates by local/state governments and the recommended CDC guidelines. And, unfortunately, postponement is not a viable option based on permitting and venue availability.

We know that this news may be disappointing to you. We also understand the hours you have dedicated to training for this race. Please know that this cancellation was made with the safety of the entire community in mind. All registered participants have the option to transfer to another triathlon in the series at no additional cost or request a full refund. Every participant should receive an email with details on how to complete this process. Please fill it out no later than Friday, August 7th. Please allow at least 60 days to process your refunds or transfer requests.

We look forward to seeing you soon! We will continue to post blogs & social media on triathlon, training, and everything you need for a healthy & happy lifestyle.

Complete your transfer/refund

Due to the cancellation of the 2020 Kerrville Triathlon, all registered participants can transfer to one of our 2021 triathlons at no cost or request a full refund. A form must be submitted for each registration on your account.

Events that are open to transfer include:

Participants who wish to upgrade distances at the 2021 CapTex Tri or 2021 Kerrville Tri will need to pay the difference in registration for that distance. That request can only be filled after the transfer to the original distance is complete. All participants who do not wish to transfer your registration to next year’s event may request a full refund.

Every participant should receive an email with details on how to complete this process. If you didn’t please check your spam folder. If you still can’t find it, email info@kerrvilletriathlon.com and we are happy to resend you the link. Please fill out the form and submit by Friday, August 7th. If no action is taken by the deadline you will automatically be transferred to next year’s Kerrville Tri at no cost.

Please keep in mind, all merchandise & USAT Membership purchases will be refunded for the event, regardless of transfer or refund request. Please allow at least 60 days to process your refunds or transfer requests. We appreciate your patience.

Run Austin Virtual Series

Don’t let your training stop just because Kerrville Tri isn’t happening! Stay motivated with the Run Austin Virtual Run Series! The 6 virtual runs will be introduced at the beginning of each month, have a unique distance, and Austin, Texas-theme.

Participants receive:

  • Personalized, themed bib that can be printed at home
  • Digital finisher medal
  • Online results
  • Downloadable finisher certificate

Register for each event individually or get the entire series, over $100 value, for FREE with registration for the 2021 3M Half Marathon or the 2021 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon, Half Marathon & 5K!

 

Avoid Bonking & Keep From Blowing Up

What is bonking? Bonking is when you run out of energy to complete your event. Like a car running out of gas 10 miles into a 20-mile trip. You have no fuel to continue. What is blowing up? Blowing up is starting way too fast or maintaining too high of a pace at different points of your event, which can lead to surpassing your lactate threshold & cramping causing you to stop or slow down. Like if you just put the pedal to the floor in your car and blow your gaskets or transmission. You still have plenty of fuel, but you broke other parts of your car. If you struggle with this, keep reading to learn how to avoid the bonk and prevent from blowing up. 

To keep it simple, here are the top tips to Avoid Bonking and Keep from Blowing Up

  1. Know Your Pace. Know what pace you are capable of holding for any period of time to avoid bonking. The idea is at the start of the event for the effort level to feel controlled and relatively easy. As you progress through the event, your effort level will increase to hold your pace. At the end of your event, the effort level will be extremely high to maintain your initial start pace. Even splits or negative splits are how you PR. 
  2. Know How to Fuel Properly. Know the calorie needs for the distance you are doing. If you are doing a short event (less than 45 minutes) you will not need anything more than water during your event. Your body will have enough energy from your previous night’s meal and your morning breakfast to get you through. Chances are on the shorter events you will be moving faster and having a bunch of food in your stomach is counterproductive to going fast.
  3. Know When to Refuel. If your event is longer than 45 minutes, this is when you need to start thinking about fueling for success. In general, depending on your height, weight, sport, and effort level, you will burn between 10 to 25 calories per minute. The goal is to time your calorie intake throughout your event so that you are just keeping the tank full enough to avoid bonking and running out of energy. Another rule is that you want to consume the calories before you need them. My rule of thumb is that I take in a few calories every 15 minutes starting at the 30-minute mark for any event over 1 hour. Remember you are balancing your intake with what was in your tank when you started. 

Things to consider per sport

  • Swimming. Swimming is not the ideal sport for taking in calories during a triathlon.  When you are completing a tri, you need to consider calorie-intake into account and be prepared to start fueling early on the bike to avoid bonking.
  • Avoid BonkingCycling. Cycling is built for fueling. You have bottle cages on your bike, the right choice in your race clothing will have pockets for holding gels and other forms of nutrition. There are also tons of other equipment you can add to your bike to pretty much carry as much as you want. One key is to use the aid stations on course so that you are not carrying too much. Why spend a ton of money on an 18-pound bike when you are going to carry 3 to 6 pounds of nutrition? Learning how to take a bottle hand up or even stop quickly at an aid station to make sure you have what you need is important and worth every second that you might think you are losing by just blowing by the aid station without refueling. Items we recommend consuming on the bike: water, fluids with calories, gels, chews, and bars.
  • Running. A good pocket in your run shorts, shirt, or a SpiBelt is perfect for holding a couple of gels for your run. A small handheld water bottle can also come in handy if you are needing a little water to wash down your gel or stay hydrated. Aid stations are also the key for runners. Knowing the frequency of the aid stations and what they will be supplied with before the event will help you come up with the proper nutrition plan on the run. Items I recommend consuming while running: water, fluids with calories, gels, and chews.

Tips To Avoid Bonking

To sum it up, what you need to do to avoid bonking is, know your body (pace),  know the event (what nutrition do they offer on course), have a plan to carry additional fuel, and then practice with different amounts and mixtures of nutrition at different paces until you have the perfect plan. This will all vary based on the type and length of your event, so be sure to use these tips during your Kerrville Tri training. After all, practice makes perfect!