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Take advantage of rest days and speed up your recovery process

When training for a triathlon, the last thing you probably want to hear is that you need rest days. But rest days are crucial to your recovery. Not resting can actually get in the way of your success. Your body needs time to recover from the workouts and make the necessary repairs. This is even more imperative if your next triathlon is your first half. You’re following your training plan, swimming, cycling, and running. When your regimen calls for a rest day, take it! It will aid in your training and help your body increase its capabilities and stamina. Check out the 4 reasons why you should take advantage of rest days.

  • Give your body a break

If you don’t take rest days during training it can result in stress fractures, sprains, and overall poor performance. Training every day builds stress in your body. Alongside small microscopic tears in muscles that need time to heal, your body also starts to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol. Over time, this can lead to burn-out, mental fatigue, and physical injuries. Give yourself a break mentally and physically. Pro tip: learn how brick workouts can help you prepare for race day and schedule your off day after them.

  • Speed up your recovery

Yoga on your rest day can aid in your body’s recovery process.

Planned rest days are a core part of your triathlon training, especially as you’re increasing your mileage. If you are constantly training, your body can’t utilize the rest it needs to repair itself. Over time, this will begin to degrade your muscles. By taking rest days when you’re supposed to you can speed up your recovery process. If you feel like you need to do something on these days, try foam rolling or yoga. Both are low-impact options that can keep you busy and aid in your body’s recovery.

  • Catch up on life

Training is a time-consuming process that requires commitment and hard work. But becoming too invested could keep you apart from the other parts of your life that truly matter. Spend your rest day catching up on chores or errands that need to be done. Spend time with friends and family. They’re supporting your training and will be there for you on race day!

Get outside and spend time with your family on your rest day.

You could also catch up on something you enjoy that’s been put to the side during training. All of these provide you with a physical and mental break from training. You’ll thank yourself later.

  • Stay on track

Before selecting a training plan, make sure you know the basics about all triathlon distances. When building your plan, make sure you add rest days to it. Whether you’re training with a coach or just surfed the web to find a plan, everyone advises taking rest days. There are good reasons for this. They are strategically built in to give your body a break, make repairs, and prepare you for the next set of workouts. Stick to your training plan so you can keep progressing as a triathlete. 

Triathletes that incorporate rest days into their training find the best results over the long term. They’re more than just a break from training. Rest days provide your body an opportunity to heal and repair the muscles used. They also provide a mental break so you can holistically recover. As race day approaches, make sure you’re completed prepared by knowing what to expect at your first triathlon.

Execute your plan for a successful first 70.3 distance triathlon

If you love shorter triathlons and are looking for a new challenge, then make your next goal a 70.3 distance triathlon. The 70.3, also known as half, stands for the total number of miles you’ll complete. This includes 1.2 miles swimming, 56 miles cycling, and 13.1 miles running. If all this sounds like a big challenge, don’t worry – successfully finishing a half distance triathlon is a very achievable goal. It’s the same thing you already do at other events. It’ll just take longer! How you approach this new-to-you distance will be different though. And we’re here to help you prepare for your first 70.3 distance triathlon.

  1. Start small and gradually increase

Even if you’re a regular participant when it comes to triathlon, you’ll still need to build up your endurance and stamina. The first step to take for your first 70.3 distance triathlon is to register for the event and commit to your goal. Once that’s set, make smaller goals that’ll lead to your bigger goal. They’ll help keep you on track. Now it’s time to train! 

Build your endurance by gradually increasing your distance.

Intense training is a great way to increase your stamina, but too much training can have an adverse effect on your body. Your body needs time to repair the tiny tears in your muscles that are a natural response to physical training. The right balance between training and rest days is crucial to building up your strength and endurance. For every four days that you work out, include a rest day to give your body the chance to heal. Utilize these tips when you’re ready to increase your running mileage.

  1. Practice open water swimming

Knowing how to swim and be comfortable in open water is crucial to swimming 1.2 miles. Open water swim training can help you prepare for race day. In the right setting, you can also swim longer distances. This helps because you’ll need to increase your distance over time during training. Start slow and increase the time and distance you spend in open water. You can set your goals similar to what runners do, about a 10% increase in distance each week. This gradual increase helps with stamina and increases the chances you avoid physical fatigue on race day. If open water still bugs you out, this advice will help you become more comfortable.

  1. Incorporate brick training

Brick workouts will help prepare you for your first 70.3 distance triathlon.

Brick training involves completing two types of exercises back to back with as little rest as possible in between. For triathletes, this is vital. Brick workouts include swim-to-bike, bike-to-run, or run-to-bike. While you won’t go from running to the bike on race day, this brick will still build endurance and stamina.

Implementing these workouts offer additional benefits. They’ll help you prepare for how transition will feel and what you’ll need. You’ll also get accustomed to how you’ll feel on race day with swim-to-bike and bike-to-run brick workouts. Learn more about brick workouts and check out the different workout examples.

  1. Hydration and nutrition

Your body needs fuel to perform. For a 70.3, the right balance can make or break you during race day. The long-distance and multiple events you’ll have to compete in requires the right mix of nutrition and hydration. Simple sugars and a high-carb diet alone won’t sustain you through your training or during the event. At the same time, foods high in fat slow down digestion. You’ll also need to increase your sodium intake – between 1600-2500 mg depending on how much salt is in your sweat. Aim for a low-fat, low-fiber, and high-carb diet to power through the 70.3 triathlon event during race day. Test different hydrations and nutrition during training to discover what works best for you.

Discover what hydration and nutrition work for you during training.

Aim for at least 100 calories/hour for your race-day caloric intake. At the same time, consistently hydrating yourself is just as important. You need to compensate for the sweat you’ll lose during the event. Remember, just like shorter distances, nothing new on race day! Here’s a deeper breakdown of how to fuel during the race.

In addition to the above, you’ll need dedication, consistency, and hard work. All of these combined will help prepare you for your first 70.3 distance triathlon. Keep in mind, not should change from how you’ve trained for shorter distances. What will change is the amount of time needed to train for and complete the increased distances. Soon enough you’ll cross your first 70.3 distance finish line!

Now’s the time to take advantage of Special Launch Pricing for the 2021 Kerrville Triathlon

Registration is open for the 2021 Kerrville Triathlon Festival, also known as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas. The popular destination triathlon is produced by High Five Events. It’ll celebrate its 10th anniversary on September 25-26th, in Kerrville, Texas. In 2019, more than 1800 triathletes competed in eight different events that included a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and run course along the Guadalupe River. Special Launch Pricing for The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas is currently available for all events.

“The Kerrville Triathlon continues to grow, exposing more triathletes to the Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas and the welcoming City of Kerrville,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “We look forward to another banner year while showcasing the beauty of the Texas Hill Country.”

Something for triathletes of all levels

2021 Kerrville Triathlon’s Open Division allows participants to begin regardless of age, with a mass swim start. Open Division participants are not eligible for age-group awards. Everyone else starts the swim in their division based on their age group, with two participants entering the water every few seconds. Age-group awards are given in five-year increments. Kerrville Tri also features Athena and Clydesdale categories. Aquabike and relay options are available too. The relay team can consist of two or three members. Aquabike completes the swim and the bike only.

Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirts, reusable custom water bottles, personalized race bibs, swim caps, a post-race meal, fruit, snacks, beer, and an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Kerrville Tri is a USAT-sanction event, provides professional timing, and offers professional photography. A great volunteer crew and hundreds of supportive spectators make race day memorable for everyone involved. 

Weekend full of distances

The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 25th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 26th. Participants can pick up their packet at the Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup at the host hotel, Inn of the Hills. The expo and packet pickup, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Friday, Sept. 24th, and Saturday, Sept. 25th. Special Launch Pricing for all events follows: Debra Zapata Sprint ($79), sprint aquabike ($79), sprint relay ($159), quarter ($129), quarter aquabike ($129), half ($199), half aquabike ($199), half relay ($279), kids fun run (free). 

Triathletes who can’t make it to the event can still participate through Kerrville Tri’s Virtual Challenge. Participants can complete the distances on their own time at their preferred locations. Virtual challenge participants will have until September 19th to complete the distances and submit their results.

As part of the updated policies for 2021, Kerrville Triathlon will offer free deferral to participants if a government entity issues a ban on mass gatherings due to the COVID-19 pandemic that would prevent this event from occurring. 

Build your endurance and become a better runner when you increase your run mileage

It’s been said that running is addictive. It’s also the final leg of triathlon, when you’re most exhausted. We want to go fast, push the boundaries, and better our overall time. Running longer distances is one way to learn about mental fortitude and finish your next triathlon strong. With swimming and cycling, your goal to increase your run mileage can be overwhelming when you look at the goal by itself. But we’re here to help every step of the way! Follow our guidelines and the tips below for the best way to increase your run mileage. It’s the best way to grow as a runner, reduce the chance of injury, and work towards your big goal! Pro tip: build this into your overall training plan for optimum results. Pro tip: get a new pair of shoes before you increase your run mileage if your current pair has too many miles.

Do the work – (EVERY DAY)

This is self-explanatory! Whether it’s a rest day or your longest run ever, you have to do the work. You don’t need to set records or PR every time, but you do need to be consistent. That’s how you’ll build your running stamina and teach your body to run further and further. If there’s a day where you just can’t squeeze in a run or workout (because life happens), don’t stress. Don’t try to make it up the next day. Squeeze in a foam roll or stretch session if you can and keep moving forward with your plan! Pro tip: check out these 6 motivational tips if you need a boost.

REST – (1-2 times per week)

If your training plan calls for a rest day, TAKE THE REST DAY. This allows your body the chance to recover from the previous swim, bike, or run. If you get the itch to do something, make it active recovery. Foam roll throughout the day. Set aside time for deep stretching. Take an online yoga class. Those three options will speed up the recovery process and get you ready for the next day.

Build your running stamina – (2-3 times per week)

As you increase your run mileage, you learn to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Every new long run represents a new PR for your longest run. As you hit new distances, it’s important to remain focused on form and technique. Don’t get sloppy! Remain as efficient as possible at the end of your run. Focusing on your form will allow you to generate power efficiently. This will also help with your body’s ability to consume oxygen. Brick workouts are another great way to build your stamina. Running after cycling or swimming will introduce your body to running when you’re tired. Brick workouts will prepare you for race day.

Increase body strength – (2-3 times per week)

You’ll need to prepare your body for running longer and longer distances. Break up running workouts with weight workouts. You don’t need heavy weights. Focus on lighter weights with higher repetitions. You want to push the body, burn fat, and build lean muscle. Working muscles differently than when you’re running is critical. It helps prevent the overuse of the same muscles. No weights? No problem. Focus on body resistance exercises like push-ups, sit-ups, squats, and lunges.

Set smaller goals – (1 time a week)

On a weekend morning, when it’s coolest, push yourself to run further than you did last weekend. Do this alone if needed, but running with a friend has tremendous benefits. When preparing to increase your mileage, setting that small goal of going longer than before teaches your mind and body it’s capable of completing longer distances.  You’ll eventually see that last week’s distance that was difficult is now easier. Over time, what was once thought impossible will become your warm-up. Slowly but surely increasing your mileage will put you in a prime position to run further and further. Pro tip: one speed workout a week will help you on your long runs.

There are many other factors that can impact how you increase your run mileage: diet, hydration, nutrition, cross-training, injuries, etc. Those items can be built-in and managed as you progress. Just remember, you don’t just wake up and run longer distances. Persistence and consistency are needed. Do you listen to music when you run? Add these 5 songs to your next playlist!

Crush your rides on the indoor trainer and stay motivated with this advice

Indoor trainers are a great way to stay fit and on top of your training. You can catch up on your favorite show, keep an eye on the kids, or avoid cycling in inclement weather. Using your indoor trainer is a great way to avoid air pollutants and the dangers of traffic. Hop on your indoor trainer and keep working towards your goals and continue to track your progress. You can set your own pace and follow what’s on your training plan. Select the resistance levels and choose your mileage to mimic an outdoor ride. During unfriendly cycling weather, indoor trainers provide a great way to maintain your training schedule. The tips below will help you stay motivated when riding your indoor trainer.

Pro tip: train with what’s most optimal for you and your budget. Learn about the difference between trainers and rollers. The advice below can apply to both of them!

Set a goal for your ride

Whenever you swim, bike, or run during training you should have a goal set. Whether it’s time, distance, or level of difficulty, accomplishing a small goal will help with your larger goal. You should do this whether you’re cycling outdoors or using the indoor trainer. Target your ride, distance, intensity, and resistance levels to help you accomplish your goal.

Take a break

Breaks work wonders and can make your triathlon training session more engaging. Simply get off for a few minutes. You can stretch, hydrate, grab something to eat, and get back to riding. Your body will feel more refreshed after a quick break. A break from the indoor trainer can be just like stopping at a gas station on your long ride to refuel.

Listen to your favorite upbeat music

Let’s be real. Music helps improve our focus. Pick up the earbuds or headphones and switch on some adrenaline rush inducing tunes right away. Listening to music is much safer on your indoor trainer than the open roads. You should never listen to music when cycling on the roads. You need to listen to your surroundings and be completely aware of what’s going on. But if you’re on the indoor trainer, add these 5 songs to your playlist and crank it up!

Catch up on your favorite TV shows

You can multitask with ease. This is one of the distinctive benefits of using an indoor trainer. Busy schedule keeping you from the latest season of your favorite show? Turn it on during your workout and the miles will fly by. If your training calls for a longer ride, click play on one of these sports movies on Netflix. This way you don’t have to mess with changing the channel or choosing another episode on your long ride.

Virtually ride with others through an app

Ride with your friends on your indoor trainer with a cycling app like Zwift.

Training in the digital world has its perks, especially if you’re riding indoors. If you can’t ride outdoors, there are many apps that allow you to complete a tough workout or ride virtually with your friends. You can even cycle anywhere in the world! This is a great way to stay motivated and switch up your indoor trainer routine. If you plan to use the app Zwift, check out this helpful guideline to get started.

Reward yourself

Just like any training, make sure to reward yourself. This will help keep up your motivation. Rewards for crushing smaller goals should be the same whether you’re outdoors or not. Your big goal is rewarded by crossing the finish line. Make sure you reward those smaller goals to keep chasing the larger goal! You could book a massage or get take out from your favorite restaurant.

In the digital era, indoor training has become far more engaging than we can imagine. You can catch up on your favorite shows, ride anywhere in the world, or challenge your friends. You’re also able to mimic various elements of your training plan, including resistance, difficulty, and duration. This helps you maintain your training and stay on track. Make sure you reward yourself when you hit those smaller goals on your way to your bigger goal!

Improve as a cyclist and ride as safely as possible when you master these bike skills

It is not “just riding a bike.” Everyday bike skills will not make you a better cyclist, but they can provide the foundation for you to improve. For triathletes, you can’t take advantage of speed if you don’t master certain bike skills like shifting gears and handling turns. In triathlon, every second matters. If you can get better at handling your bike, then you can potentially shave minutes off your time. Ride safely and improve as a cyclist when you master these bike skills. Pro tip: for added safety, memorize and follow the cycling rules of the road.

Practice these bike skills

Be energy efficient

Cyclist rides in an aero position, smiling at the camera, during the 2018 Kerrville Triathlon. Credit Ed Sparks.

Riding in an aero position allows you to be more energy-efficient. Credit – Ed Sparks

When you ride fast, aerodynamics play against performance by way of air and wind resistance. Proper body positioning on the bike can reduce wind resistance and make you more energy efficient. The smaller you can make yourself on the bike, the less wind resistance. If you can continue to maximize your power output in this position, you’ll save more energy for the rest of the ride and the upcoming run. Pro tip: minimize the amount of time you’re sitting up and stay in the aero bar more to reduce wind resistance.

Shifting gears

The difference between a pro and an everyday cyclist is their ability to shift gears at the most appropriate time. This is a skill that most triathletes may take for granted.

Below are the three secrets in exploiting situations using gear shifting skills

  • Climbing: Don’t go to an easy gear directly. Shift gears in their sequence as the climb advances to maintain momentum and efficiency.
  • Change gear after accelerating: You know from experience that it is easier to rev a fast gear than a heavy gear. Increase the tempo of the gear to shift into a heavier gear to overtake or a similar maneuver.
  • Heavy gear: While riding with a group, change to a bigger gear for a steadier pace that saves energy.

Passing other cyclists

Cyclist takes the corner for the final turn before transition at the Kerrville Triathlon. Credit Ed Sparks.

Get out as wide as you safely can when handling a corner. Credit – Ed Sparks

As a USAT-sanctioned event, Kerrville Triathlon abides by all of their rules. The passing rules should be followed on training rides too. 

  • Keep three lengths between the cyclist in front
  • Pass on the left, never the right
  • Complete within 15 seconds

Handling corners

Mastery over this skill can help you maintain as much speed as possible. Follow the below steps to maneuver corners like a pro.

  • Launch into a corner in an open curve
  • Hook the peak point of the bend
  • Get out as wide as you safely can
  • If you need to slow down, do it before entering the corner
  • Never apply brakes while in the bend

Hydrating

Cyclist rides during the rain with her hydration bottles visible during the Kerrville Triathlon. Credit Ed Sparks.

Make sure you have plenty of hydration with you for longer rides. Credit – Ed Sparks

This is often the toughest skill to master for most cyclists. When practicing this, start off at a slower speed and build your way up. If your bottle is in a rack below you, get some speed and stop pedaling. As you coast, focus on your balance. With the hand you’re most comfortable with, reach down and grab your bottle. Maintain balance of the bike with the other hand. Drink and place the bottle back. Repeat as necessary until you become more familiar. Increase speed and add pedaling as this move becomes more natural. Pro tip: this blog further breaks down how to hydrate while you ride and highlights the best items for just that.

Fixing a flat

Don’t get caught stranded because of a flat tire. This information is valuable whether you’re racing or on a long training ride. To fix the flat tire of a bike, follow the below procedure. Make sure you’re prepared for anything and when you have these essential items in your saddlebag.

  • Remove the wheel from the bike and take out the tube
  • Closely inspect to find the puncture, check for embedded objects
  • Replace the tube with a spare or patch it up
  • Put everything back and continue riding

Set aside time every day to practice these bike skills. You will get better over time, especially as you become more familiar and comfortable with each skill. Before you know it, you’ll show others the tricks you come up with to make cycling easier for yourself.

Learn how long running shoes last and see if it’s time for a new pair

Running shoes are designed to be tough. They protect you from many surfaces, give you hundreds of miles, and support your feet and joints. However, they suffer repeated pounding and won’t last forever. On average, you will need a new pair of running shoes every 300-500 miles. This amount varies with each runner. While some runners may need to change their shoes every 300 miles, several others may not require a new pair after 500 miles. All miles aren’t the same and there are many factors that determine the lifespan of your running shoes. Pro tip: keep your motivation high with these running quotes.

How to tell if your shoes are worn out

Normally you can tell your shoes are worn out by simply looking at them. As the shoes break down your body will also tell you it is time to get a new pair.

Wear on the bottom: your shoes won’t perform their job if they’ve lost their tread or there are tears or holes in the fabric. The cushion will also decrease over time. As that happens, your body will feel more of the impact during your run.

Discomfort or pain: if you feel aches or experience discomfort even after a few miles, it means your shoes have aged. This mostly happens when the midsole foam loses its bouncing ability, making you feel like there’s nothing under your feet. 

Blisters: you may develop blisters if you wear a pair of worn-out shoes.

How long do running shoes last?

Typically, running shoes last anywhere between 300-500 miles. There are runners that replace their shoes every four months, but a general rule of thumb is to replace them every six months. Keep in mind this depends on how many miles you run and where you complete them.

Track your miles

You can easily track the mileage through smart devices. A smartwatch is the perfect example. There are also apps developed for runners. Simply register your running shoes, manage and track with the click of some buttons! Pro tip: MapMyRun syncs with various Under Armour running shoes that have Bluetooth connectivity.

Tips to make your shoes last longer

Get a separate pair for different activities. If you cross-train or run trails you should have separate pairs of shoes for different activities. Do not use your running shoes for walking or wear them during a strength workout. Running shoes won’t last forever and having different pairs can extend the life of your shoes. Pro tip: learn about brick workouts and how changing into running shoes can help you practice transition.

Get fitted by a professional

Get help from a knowledgeable person at your local running store when buying a new pair. They can determine the best pair or the best fit for you based on your arch height, foot size, and need. 

Take care of your shoes

Avoid exposing your shoes to extreme temperatures. After each run, clean and store them in a dry place. A little care will go a long way in extending their longevity.

Don’t let these common misconceptions about triathlon keep you from your next adventure

If you’re new to triathlons or can’t decide if you want to participate in one, it’s probably because you have some questions. We’re here to debunk common misconceptions about triathlons. With all the craziness of everyday life, adding triathlon training can seem nearly impossible. Whether you don’t have the time, resources, or you doubt your abilities, we are here to tell you that you can do it by breaking through these common misconceptions about triathlon.

It’s too expensive

The great thing about your first triathlon is you probably already have all the gear you would need! Let’s start with the basics. A swimsuit and goggles are all you need for the swim portion. We will provide you with a swim cap based on your age group and/or division. You may think you need an expensive racing bike, but any bike that will get you from A to B is just fine! If you don’t have a bike, that’s okay too – you can rent one or borrow one from a friend. Top it off with any bike helmet and you’re all set! For the run, you just need shoes, which you should already have. That’s it! You’re ready to tri. Pro tip: if you plan to buy a bike, make sure you follow our dos and don’ts of bike buying.

Training takes too much time

A sprint distance tri does not require as much training as you may think. Depending on your current swimming, cycling, and running abilities, you will know what areas you need to focus on. With that being said, you can train as little as 3 to 5 workouts a week (2 swims, 2 bikes, 1 run) to get you race-ready. Focus on your weakness and complete more of those workouts as needed. If your days are limited during the week, incorporate brick workouts and complete two disciplines in one day.

Must be a super athlete

Triathletes come in different ages, shapes, and sizes. If you can swim in a straight line, ride a bike, and put one foot in front of the other, you can complete a triathlon! According to USAT, the average age of triathletes is 38. The second-largest age group of participants is 40-44. It’s never too early or too late to start your tri journey. The Debra Zapata Sprint triathlon is ideal for beginner triathletes. It gives you a chance to get comfortable with the sport before attempting a long-distance race. Pro tip: learn about the different distances of triathlon.

Have to be able to swim, bike, and run

If you want to participate in a tri, but cannot complete one of the legs for any reason, you can still race! Get together a relay team of 2 to 3 people. You can divide up the work while still getting to experience a tri. We also have an Aquabike option available if you know you cannot complete the run portion.

You need a coach

There are endless options of free training plans online created by professional coaches for every distance triathlon. Once you find one, stick to the training plan and trust the process. Having a coach is great if you are trying to improve your time. But with all the resources out there, a coach is not necessary for your first tri. 

We’ve broken down common misconceptions about triathlon and now it’s time to get started. But before you do, read about other people’s first triathlons and learn about their experiences. High Five Events’ very own employees Laura, Tina, and William recount the experiences of their first triathlons, the good and the bad!

You don’t want to miss these inspirational sports movies and documentaries on Netflix

Everyone can use a motivational boost every once in a while! Netflix has several sports movies and documentaries which can lift your mood any day. The list below is perfect for your next rest day. You can also click play before your next long ride on the indoor trainer. Follow this helpful guide to get set up on Zwift. You just might have your best training ride! Here is a list of our top inspirational sports movies and documentaries. Pro tip: watch one of these for an extra boost before your next brick workout.

100 Meters

100 Meters is a Spanish movie about a man who tries to compete in an Iron Man race. Despite suffering from multiple sclerosis, he defies odds by training for the triathlon race with help from his father-in-law.

Rising Phoenix

A recent documentary, Rising Phoenix captures the lives of nine athletes and their respective journeys in the Paralympic Games. This movie informs viewers’ understanding of specially gifted individuals and their athletic talents.

Lorena, Light-Footed Woman

Looking for a woman-centric sports documentary? This inspiring story is of Lorena Ramirez who gives up her pastoral existence to participate in ultramarathons by wearing sandals. It is a must-watch for all female sports enthusiasts.

Lucha: Playing the Impossible

This documentary is an inspiration for all aspiring sportswomen. The performance of Luciana Aymar, a player on the Argentinian women’s hockey team, is noticed by players, coaches, and fans across the globe. Lucha eventually puts her country’s hockey team under the international spotlight when she becomes one of only two women from Argentina to win four Olympic medals.

Bobby Robson: More Than a Manager

Featuring British coach Sir Bobby Robson, this movie depicts the manager who garnered respect for his polite demeanor in the football field. Robson is credited for building the careers of many football players like Jose Mourinho, Terry Butcher, Paul Gascoigne, and Pep Guardiola. The story shows how as a manager he led his team away from political issues and helped them attain success.

A Life of Speed: The Juan Manuel Fangio Story

A Life of Speed is the tale of Juan Manuel Fangio who rose from humble beginnings as a mechanic’s son and became a well-known racing car champion. The story gives viewers a glimpse into the risky profession of motor car racing and shows one man who defeated circumstances to win five world titles on some of the most challenging tasks.

Dangal

Dangal is a biographical story of a former wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat who trains his two daughters to win at the Commonwealth Games. Phogat successfully leads his children to victory by overcoming gender stereotypes and other challenges. A must watch for those interested in women’s empowerment in the sports realm.

Feel like you need more of a boost? Add these 10 quotes and 6 running tips to the mix!

Kick things up a notch when you add these songs to your running playlist

Click refresh on your running playlist when you add these 5 songs. Your running playlist will never be the same! Strategically place them so the energy boost arrives right when you need it most. The right song can work wonders when you need an extra boost. Updating your running playlist is an excellent motivational running tip. Check out this blog for 5 more motivational tips!

Sunny Came Home – Shawn Colvin

Shawn sang the National Anthem at the 2018 and ‘19 Kerrville Triathlon before competing! The calming demeanor of this song will help you relax on long runs and recovery runs. Plus, it won two Grammys.

Knights of Cydonia – Muse

Need some audio energy? Put this song on your playlist. It’s roughly 6 minutes of hard-hitting, fight-the-establishment, in-your-face rock and roll. Click play and buckle up!

Born This Way – Lady Gaga

Prepare to skip the warm-up if your running playlist kicks things off with this song. Get ready to get moving when you click play because you were born this way!

Fly Farm Blues – Jack White

When new school goes old school. When this song first comes on you might think it’s an oldie, but just wait. The electricity pours out and will energize you on your run!

Fancy – Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Keep the energy going with this back-and-forth ballad. The drums and guitar take turns while you keep pushing forward, one step at a time.

Add these songs to your running playlist before your next run. They can pump you up, allow you to catch your breath, or help you focus on the warm-up/cool-down. These songs are the perfect way to get you going during the run portion of your brick workout. However you incorporate music, just make sure you can still hear your surroundings. It’s important to know what’s going on around you!