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Avoid Bonking & Keep From Blowing Up

What is bonking? Bonking is when you run out of energy to complete your event. Like a car running out of gas 10 miles into a 20-mile trip. You have no fuel to continue. What is blowing up? Blowing up is starting way too fast or maintaining too high of a pace at different points of your event, which can lead to surpassing your lactate threshold & cramping causing you to stop or slow down. Like if you just put the pedal to the floor in your car and blow your gaskets or transmission. You still have plenty of fuel, but you broke other parts of your car. If you struggle with this, keep reading to learn how to avoid the bonk and prevent from blowing up. 

To keep it simple, here are the top tips to Avoid Bonking and Keep from Blowing Up

  1. Know Your Pace. Know what pace you are capable of holding for any period of time to avoid bonking. The idea is at the start of the event for the effort level to feel controlled and relatively easy. As you progress through the event, your effort level will increase to hold your pace. At the end of your event, the effort level will be extremely high to maintain your initial start pace. Even splits or negative splits are how you PR. 
  2. Know How to Fuel Properly. Know the calorie needs for the distance you are doing. If you are doing a short event (less than 45 minutes) you will not need anything more than water during your event. Your body will have enough energy from your previous night’s meal and your morning breakfast to get you through. Chances are on the shorter events you will be moving faster and having a bunch of food in your stomach is counterproductive to going fast.
  3. Know When to Refuel. If your event is longer than 45 minutes, this is when you need to start thinking about fueling for success. In general, depending on your height, weight, sport, and effort level, you will burn between 10 to 25 calories per minute. The goal is to time your calorie intake throughout your event so that you are just keeping the tank full enough to avoid bonking and running out of energy. Another rule is that you want to consume the calories before you need them. My rule of thumb is that I take in a few calories every 15 minutes starting at the 30-minute mark for any event over 1 hour. Remember you are balancing your intake with what was in your tank when you started. 

Things to consider per sport

  • Avoid BonkingSwimming. Swimming is not the ideal sport for taking in calories during a triathlon.  When you are completing a tri, you need to consider calorie-intake into account and be prepared to start fueling early on the bike to avoid bonking.
  • Cycling. Cycling is built for fueling. You have bottle cages on your bike, the right choice in your race clothing will have pockets for holding gels and other forms of nutrition. There are also tons of other equipment you can add to your bike to pretty much carry as much as you want. One key is to use the aid stations on course so that you are not carrying too much. Why spend a ton of money on an 18-pound bike when you are going to carry 3 to 6 pounds of nutrition? Learning how to take a bottle hand up or even stop quickly at an aid station to make sure you have what you need is important and worth every second that you might think you are losing by just blowing by the aid station without refueling. Items we recommend consuming on the bike: water, fluids with calories, gels, chews, and bars.
  • Running. A good pocket in your run shorts, shirt, or a SpiBelt is perfect for holding a couple of gels for your run. A small handheld water bottle can also come in handy if you are needing a little water to wash down your gel or stay hydrated. Aid stations are also the key for runners. Knowing the frequency of the aid stations and what they will be supplied with before the event will help you come up with the proper nutrition plan on the run. Items I recommend consuming while running: water, fluids with calories, gels, and chews.

Tips To Avoid Bonking

To sum it up, what you need to do to avoid bonking is, know your body (pace),  know the event (what nutrition do they offer on course), have a plan to carry additional fuel, and then practice with different amounts and mixtures of nutrition at different paces until you have the perfect plan. This will all vary based on the type and length of your event, so be sure to use these tips during your Kerrville Tri training. After all, practice makes perfect!

Knowing the rules of the road is crucial to keep you and the rest of your squad safe

Follow these rules of the road every time you ride and to stay safe during your training for your upcoming triathlon!

9 must-know safety tips for your next ride

Stay safe during your training rides by knowing the rules of the road. Whether you’re riding to lunch with co-workers around the block or completing a long training ride for Kerrville Triathlon Festival, the following group riding guidelines will come in handy. Knowing these rules of the road will also make the ride more enjoyable and safer for everyone involved. Memorize these 9 Rules of the Road to cover your butt and keep you safe. 

Cycling Rules of the Road for your upcoming ride

  1. Complete a quick, pre-ride safety check.
  2. Obey all traffic laws. Here are a few examples: Yield to pedestrians, use the bike lane, use hand signals, and watch out for traffic lights! Just like in a car, the same rules apply when riding a bike.  Do not run red lights!
  3. Operate bike in such a manner as to not offend or endanger motorists, pedestrians, etc.
  4. Wear a helmet for safety (and be a good model for children).
  5. Activate all lights on bikes.
  6. Wear reflective gear that makes the group more visible, even in the daytime.
  7. Ride single file when you’re with others except in areas where it is safe to ride side-by-side.
  8. Avoid slowing down abruptly or making any other sudden moves.
  9. Ask experienced riders questions when you’re not sure what is occurring.

Important hand signals

On your left! You’ve probably experienced fellow cyclists shouting at you in efforts to get your attention on the road. But, hand signals, instead of words, are used to warn riders of potential danger on the roadway. Especially when riding in a pack, the only cyclist who has enough visual warning is the front cyclist. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the lead rider to warn the cyclists behind them. If the lead cyclist (or the cyclist in front of you):

  • shakes their hand to the right = there’s a pothole, branch, or some obstacle to the right
  • shakes their hand to the left = there’s an obstacle to the left
  • puts hand behind their posterior = follow right behind them as there might be obstacles on both sides
  • puts right hand down with the flat of the hand facing you = lead cyclist is slowing down or coming to a stop

It’s crucial to know these hand signals to keep yourself safe when riding alone to avoid a collision with another cyclist. Last but not least, being aware of your surroundings is essential to keep yourself safe during a ride. Be on the lookout and apply these rules of the road to keep yourself safe next time you go for a ride.

Performance Sunglasses for the trendiest triathletes

When it comes to being a triathlete, there is a lot of gear needed to race your best the morning of a tri. However, there’s an important piece of tri gear that often gets overlooked: performance sunglasses. After all, you wear them for 2/3 of the tri during the run leg and bike leg. We know looking for the right pair of shades that look great and meets both your running and cycling needs can be difficult. Find a pair that meets your personal style and performance needs with these recommendations of reliable, stylish performance sunglasses for your upcoming tri.

 

STYLISH PERFORMANCE SUNGLASSES FOR THE TRENDY TRIATHLETE

Lookin’ cool out on the Kerrville Tri course!

Bottom Line:

Performance sunglasses are a must. They protect your eyes from dirt, harmful rays from the sun, and other possible debris that may come your way during a race. The last thing you want to do is fidget with a pair in the middle of your race. Having the right pair of sunglasses can make or break your performance on race day. With these stylish performance sunglasses, you’ll be ready to crush it this year’s Kerrville Tri, and look cool in the process! Keep this in mind next time you’re in the market for some tri shades: the lighter the better, protection from UV rays is crucial, and comfort is key.

Try these dryland swim training exercises to help build strength and improve your performance in the water

Training for the swim portion of your upcoming tri is always important. Although this workout won’t be identical to the benefits you get while actually in the water, such as perfecting your form and practicing your breathing; focusing on these muscles is valuable to enhancing your performance during your tri.   Think of these exercises as a way of targeting the same muscle groups you would activate while swimming to keep making forward progress when you’re unable to hit the pool. These dryland swim exercises focus on working your core muscles, quads, glutes, chest, arms, back, and shoulders much like you would in the water.

Burpees

A burpee essentially works all the muscles you would activate during a pool session, but is especially beneficial to help build your stamina. Full body and functional exercise that works on your muscle endurance as well as aerobic capacity.

  1. Start standing with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Lower yourself into a squatting position and place your hands on the floor in front of you.
  3. Jump your feet back, putting yourself into a pushup position.
  4. Do a pushup.
  5. Jump your feet back into their original position.
  6. Stand yourself upright, jump into the air, and clap your hands over your head.

Repeat this exercise in 3 sets of 15.

Lat Pulldown

For this upper body exercise, you need some weight. However, stay light and stretch your shoulders well to reduce the risk of injury.

To do this type of Lat pulldown:

  1. Sit down at a pulldown machine and place your hands wide apart on the bar, palms facing forward.
  2. Bring the bar down straight down to your clavicle.
  3. Keep your torso still as you pull your arms down.
  4. Draw your shoulders back, pulling the bar down as you exhale.
  5. When the bar touches your clavicle and your shoulder blades are completely contracted, count to 2.
  6. Slowly bring your arms back up to starting position, as you inhale.

Control is key during this exercise. Trying to go fast will not work your muscles efficiently and can injure you. If you keep the weight low, you can do 3 sets of 25 for this exercise. don’t rush the exercise don’t go too fast or too slow

Pull-ups

If you do not have access to a pull-down machine, pull-ups will also work your back, muscle, and arms, providing great swimming dryland workout. You can even use the monkey bars at a local playground for this one.

How to do a proper pull-up:

  1. Move your arms shoulder-width apart and grasp an overhead bar with a firm, overhand grip.
  2. Hang so your arms and legs are straight.
  3. Steady your core.
  4. Keep your back straight and do not swing yourself.
  5. Pull yourself up, so that your head is over the bar, leaving the bar at your chest.
  6. Slowly lower your body back to hanging position.

You should also do this same exercise with your hands gripped close together at different distances, to work different muscles. Shoot for about 5 sets of as many proper pull-ups as your strength will allow during each set.

Reaching Lunges

This exercise works your quads and glutes. It will help you with changing direction and help you prevent injuries.

To do a reaching lunge:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Step far forward with your right leg and shift your weight so that your heel hits the floor.
  3. Descend until your right shin is vertical and your right thigh is parallel to the floor.
  4. Lightly tap your left knee to the floor.
  5. Put your weight back onto your right heel to bring yourself back upright.
  6. Repeat with your left leg.

When doing these exercises, keep yourself balanced and make sure your knee is bent at a 90º angle does not stick out further than your toe. On each side, also do 3 sets of 15 for this exercise.

T Rotational Pushups

This spin on the traditional pushup offers you a more intense workout. It provides a better core workout, while still hitting the upper body and hip extensors.

To do a T rotational pushup:

  1. Begin with a rigid torso, in a standing pushup position with your arms and feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Descend, bringing yourself chest to the floor.
  3. Start ascending until your arms are straight.
  4. Shift over into a side plank position keeping your arms straight.
  5. Rotate back to push up positions.
  6. Repeat on the other side

Do 10 reps total, alternating each side, for 3 sets.

Incorporate these dryland swim workouts into your Kerrville Tri training plan so you can be a stronger, more confident swimmer when you hit the water at your next tri.

Showing off those muscles, and getting pumped up for the swim!

Don’t let your tri training mess up your do! Here are some quick tips to protect and prevent damage to your hair during your swim training

Chlorine is very damaging to your hair because it strips your hair of its natural oils, making it easier for your hair to become dry and break off or split at the ends. Keep your hairdo looking brand new for as long as possible when you use these tips to prevent damage to your hair during your training for Kerrville Tri!

Before

1. Wet Your Hair

Wetting your hair before you get in the pool will minimize the amount of chlorine and other chemicals your hair will absorb. 

2. Protect Your Hair

Take it a step further by putting a protectant in your hair before you hop in the pool! Putting a protectant, such as coconut oil, on before prevents your hair from soaking up the chemicals in the water, while also moisturizing your hair.

3. Wear a Swim Cap

Wearing a swim cap during your swim training is the best way to prevent chlorine from soaking into your hair. This method to prevent hair damage is very effective and it’s reusable and inexpensive.

4. Style Your Hair

If a swim cap isn’t for you, find a quick and easy way to style your hair before your workouts, such as a braid or bun, to keep your hair from getting tangled in the pool.

Your hair is bound to get some exposure to the chlorine. Follow these steps to prevent further damage to your hair after your pool session.

After

1. Rinse Immediately

After getting out of the pool, you’ll want to rinse your hair right away. You don’t have to give your hair a full wash, but it’s crucial to rinse the pool water from your hair to stop any future damage from happening. 

2. Comb Gently

Your hair will most likely be tangly from your swim. Be sure to brush your hair gently to prevent the ends from breaking off! Use a leave-in conditioner or detangling spray if you need to. 

3. Deep Condition

You will want to put a clarifying, deep conditioner in your hair once a week, or every 4 to 5 workouts, depending on how often you hit the pool. This will get rid of any hidden chlorine deposits throughout the hair to keep your hair looking healthy for as long as possible. 

We often forget or don’t think about how damaging chlorine really is during all the pool training that leads up to your tri. Protect your hair and save yourself some money when you use these tips to protect your hair during your swim training while preparing for your upcoming tri!

Think you can skip training for the swim for your next tri? Not so fast!

You’re an ok swimmer so you don’t feel like you should allot a bunch of time training for the swim. Fast forward to the morning of your tri, add in race day elements – open water, other athletes, and no lanes to keep you in check – it’s no wonder why even seasoned triathletes may face panic during the swim. Know the importance of swim training with 5 reasons why you shouldn’t ignore swim training for your upcoming triathlon.5 Reasons You Shouldn't Ignore Your Swim Training

1. Helps Prevent Injury

Getting your body accustomed to handle the first leg of the tri is crucial. Swimming is a low-intensity, low-impact workout that will improve your overall flexibility, heart and lung capacity. Developing this during your training will prevent any unexpected incidents on race day. Train for the distance you are going to swim in your upcoming tri. Start slow and work your way up to this distance during your workouts. You can always slow down and take it easy on the bike and run legs, but during the intensity and commotion of the swim, your options are limited. For safety reasons, you cannot complete the race if you are unable to complete the swim portion. Therefore, you should practice floating on your back and practice a safety stroke as a backup plan if you start to feel tired or get frantic during the swim.

2. Avoid Swimming Further Than You Have To

5 Reasons You Shouldnt Ignore Your Swim Training

For those who have done most of your training in a pool, you are used to having a guide to keep you swimming in a straight line. If you don’t practice sighting during your training, you’ll most likely end up zig-zagging between the buoys, thus adding to the distance you have to swim on race morning. Don’t count on following the person in front of you. Sight regularly throughout the swim course to make sure you stay on the correct side of the buoys. Practicing sighting is key to avoid swimming off course during your tri.

3. Good Cardiovascular Activity

Swimming is a great aerobic exercise that will improve your cardiovascular fitness and overall health. It’s easy on your joints and is a perfect low-impact cardio exercise that can help reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. Choose a training plan that focuses on improving your swim technique to reserve your energy for the remaining legs of the race.  Also, establishing a good technique before the race will make you more efficient in the water on race day.

4. Strengthen Your Legs

Leg strength can make or break a race, so don’t make the mistake of neglecting leg work in the pool. If you haven’t spent much time in the water during your training, your legs may feel weak after completing the swim portion. To avoid feeling weak throughout the bike and run portion, use various swimming workouts to strengthen your legs during your training. The resistance from the water will strengthen your legs more than running or cycling alone. Incorporate kick sets into your swim training plan to ensure you have trained for your distance properly.  Pro tip: As you near the exit swim, start kicking your legs a little stronger to get the blood circulating into your legs again to prepare for the run into transition.

5. Calm Pre-Race Nerves

5 Reasons You Shouldn't Ignore Your Swim Training

Despite all your training, things can go awry when you factor in hundreds of other athletes into the mix. Nerves on race morning can get pretty overwhelming. Especially if this is your first triathlon. Even with a time trial start, swimming with so many people of all different skill levels can unnerve a highly skilled swimmer. You need to build your confidence in the water before the race. Most training takes place in a pool, but try joining a local tri club or a Masters Swimming Program to get the experience of swimming in open water with other athletes. Pro tip: Get out and do a mock swim so there are no surprises for your open-water swim.

It is common for athletes to dread the first discipline of a tri. Preparing for this during your training will eliminate any uncertainties you have before you dive into the swim start.  Whether you’re a novice swimmer or trying to go from a good swimmer to a great swimmer, training is key to a good performance on race day. So don’t hurt yourself by ignoring swim training for your upcoming tri! Grab your gear and head to the water.

You did it! You successfully crossed the Kerrville Tri finish line and made all your hard work pay off! Check out these 5 sure-fire ways to help you stay motivated after completing your tri

1. Train with friends

train for your triathlon with friends

You’ve come this far, keep making progress in your fitness journey by continuing your training routine! What better way to make tri training fun than getting a group together to train with you? This is a great way to keep you motivated while also holding you accountable to keep up with your training. Training with friends is also an excellent way to hear about other training plans and techniques. If you do get a group together, consider getting a coach to help guide you even more!

2. Look back at your old race photos

Take a second to look back at some of your old race photos. You’ll see how good you looked and remember how incredible it felt in the moment of completing your tri. Better yet, look at your finisher medals to give yourself a little reminder of the rush you got when you took those finals steps over the finish line.

3. Sign up for another Tri

Just because off-season is around the corner doesn’t mean you should stop your training. Registering for another tri, or a short distance run such as the Austin Marathon 5K will motivate you to keep up the hard work and give you something to look forward to!

4. Set small goals with rewards along the way

Set weekly goals such as getting up and completing a run every morning then treat yourself at the end of the week. Spoil yourself and grab some new tri gear that you can rock during your next triathlon (another reason to keep yourself motivated) or get out and go for a bite at your favorite spot! These small goals you set for yourself along the way will ultimately lead to you improving your performance for your next tri!

5. Celebrate your achievements!

After all, you spent months training for Kerrville Tri and you accomplished your goal by crossing the finish line, take a moment to give yourself a high five and be proud of yourself!crossing the Kerrville Tri finish line

Our 2019 Kerrville Ambassadors are experts on all things Kerrville Tri! 

Who better than to ask for race advice than an experienced Kerrville triathlete? Feel free to get to know the 2019 Kerrville Tri Ambassadors to ask any and all questions you may have about the 2019 Smokin’ Good Tri! Plus, if you’re new to triathlon, seeing a familiar face on race morning will help ease some of your nerves!

Michelle Bonathan

2019 KTF Ambassador

Michelle Bonathan – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

In addition to being a triathlete I am a dog mom of two, and wife to an ultra runner. I love being a Kerrville Tri Ambassador because it gives me a platform to talk to athletes of all ages, distances, and speeds. I was not an athlete growing up and thought the idea of triathlons was ridiculous, but when I finished my first race (on a dare!) the sport immediately found a special place in my heart. The Kerrville Tri Festival is amazing because you get to see athletes out for the long haul doing the half, speedsters flying by, and the smile of a triathlete at their first finish line all at the same race. Connect with her on Facebook or Instagram

Annette Kobus

2019 KTF Ambassador

Annette Kobus – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I’ve always loved the venue and it’s always on my birthday weekend! I’ve raced the Sprint and Quarter distances and when I wasn’t racing, I volunteer every year for this race. The past couple of years I have not raced because of bone-on-bone arthritis, but this year I’m sporting total knee replacements. I’m planning to again race the Sprint (yay Annette!) and of course, I’ll volunteer on Sunday for the Half. When my knees are more stable, I really want my first Half to be at Kerrville! Connect with her on Facebook

 

Susan Oyler

2019 KTF Ambassador

Susan Oyler – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I’m a military wife, mother, engineer and age-group triathlete. I am a natural team builder and love being part of the Kerrville Triathlon team and getting to connect with other triathletes. 2018 was the first time I participated in the Kerrville Triathlon Festival and I was HOOKED!  It is a top-notch event! This race has everything a triathlete wants in a race: a gorgeous venue and a challenging course! Connect with her on Instagram

 

 

Barbara Bussey

2019 KTF Ambassador

Barbara Bussey – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I began my running/tri career just trying to get an “A” in my PE class in nursing school.  Luckily for me, the exercise stuck (and yes, I got the “A”). That was back in 2000, since then I have run 12-15 half marathons, more 10Ks than I can count completed an unknown number of sprint/super-sprint tris and this September, I will complete my 2nd 70.3 in Kerrville.

Running and triathlon feels like freedom to me.  Freedom from worries, freedom to truly enjoy the outdoors, freedom to challenge myself to be better.  Exercise has also brought me closer to my daughter, she seems to have caught the same bug I did all those years ago, and now we challenge each other to reach greater achievements than we thought possible.  On the days when I really just do not feel it, I remember a saying I heard once: the longest distance in running, is the six inches in between your ears! I know that anyone can master those six inches, one stride or tri at a time!

Cat Adkins

2019 KTF Ambassador

Cat Adkins – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

5 years ago, I decided to give triathlon a try. I’d only participated in about 5 triathlons before Kerrville but it quickly became my favorite. I fell in love with the triathlon community that weekend. It was wonderful knowing that everyone you passed was there for the same reason. It’s hard to not make friends quickly when you spend a weekend with people you have so much in common with. 5 years later, all the people I met are close friends and the circle just keeps growing. I have since bullied dozens of athletes to do their 1st tri with me. It’s hard for people to tell me they’re intimidated to do something that I’m capable of. I eat too much, drink too much, and party too hard, so people usually think, “If this mess can do it, certainly I can too!” What can I say? I’m inspiring. Connect with her on Facebook or Instagram

Kristen Farwell

2019 KTF Ambassador

Kristen Farwell – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I am relatively new to triathlon, just finishing my third season. Until this past year, I had only done Sprints and Kerrville 2018 was my first Olympic. It’s my second year racing the event and I can’t express how much I love this event. From beginning to end, the event is well organized, well supported and on the day of, executed flawlessly. It’s my favorite course and already have my hotel reservation for 2019. I would love to help share the love, especially for those who might be new and intimidated by an unfamiliar or out-of-town race. I pride myself on being outgoing and helpful. Connect with her on Instagram

Mary McDonald

2019 KTF Ambassador

Mary McDonald – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I’ve raced triathlons both big and small all over the USA for many years and love that the Kerrville Tri is right here in Texas! I love being an ambassador for the Kerrville Tri because it is a race with personality! Race distances for everyone and a fun old school atmosphere. And the fun doesn’t stop after you cross the finish line! Cool off by floating down the river and enjoying the after-party! Connect with her on Twitter or Instagram 

 

 

Mark Schnur

2019 KTF Ambassador

Mark Schnur – Kerrville Tri Ambassador

I love the Kerrville Tri because it is part of a fun weekend in Kerrville, held on a scenic course, close to where I live in San Antonio, and is so well supported by the community! I am a great ambassador because I have over 30 years of experience in racing triathlons (since 1987), and I have coached and trained with many successful triathletes and because I love the Kerrville Tri. Connect with him on Instagram

 

 

 

Reach out to your 2019 Smokin’ Good Tri Ambassadors for any questions you have before race day! Also, get some insider info to help you decide which distance is perfect for you to complete Kerrville Tri with us on September 28th and 29th! 

The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas opens vendor registration for two-day expo

Group photo before 2018 Kerrville Triathlon, which just opened vendor registration for 2019.

In 2018, more than 2000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to Kerrville, Texas.

Vendor registration is open for the 2019 Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup. For two days, businesses and brands have the opportunity to interact with an engaged triathlon community at The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas. Registration for 2019 is trending well-ahead of 2018, indicating that Kerrville Triathlon continues to be a destination weekend for triathletes. In 2018, more than 2000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to the Texas Hill Country. The 9th annual Kerrville Triathlon will take place September 27-29, in Kerrville, Texas. 

“Every year, the Kerrville Triathlon brings more than 2,000 people into our community and we’re proud to be host to such an amazing event,” said Charlie McIlvain, President & CEO Kerrville Convention & Visitors Bureau. “That’s more than 2,000 people who are coming to not only compete, but to experience, taste, and shop all that Kerrville has to offer and then go home and share that with friends and family!”

In 2018, more than 2000 triathletes and their friends and family traveled to the Texas Hill Country

Triathletes and their friends and family are invited to visit the two-day expo. They can pick up their packets, check out the latest triathlon gear, and take advantage of race-weekend deals. Vendors can showcase and sell products, offer complementary services, and host giveaways. In 2018, participants traveled to the Texas Hill Country from 17 different states. Vendors can submit their application on the website.

“Kerrville Tri registration continues to grow year-after-year and the expo is a major reason for that increase,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “The growth has resulted in the two-day expo selling out earlier and earlier each year.”

Athletes will receive a belt buckle finisher’s medal, customized shirt, commemorative trucker hat, and an individual float. They’ll get a reusable custom water bottle, personalized race bib, and swim cap. Once they cross the finish line, triathletes can enjoy a post-race meal including fajitas and tacos from H-E-B, fruit, snacks, beer garden, and an opportunity to float in the Guadalupe River. Professional timing and photography, a great volunteer crew, hundreds of supportive spectators, and an electric finish line festival will showcase why the Kerrville Triathlon is one of the best triathlons in Texas. 

The Kerrville Triathlon Expo and Packet Pickup will take place on September 27-28 at Inn of the Hills, the host hotel. The expo and packet pickup will be open on Friday, September 27th from 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. The Saturday, September 28th, hours are 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. The expo is free and open to the public. The Debra Zapata Sprint distance, sprint relay, sprint aquabike, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, Sept. 28th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, Sept. 29th. Registration is available on the website.

10-week sprint distance triathlon training program to get you ready for Kerrville Tri

Professional triathlete and coach Paul “Barny” Matthews has built a 10-week sprint distance triathlon training plan to get you ready for this year’s Kerrville Triathlon on September 28th! If you want to complete the Debra Zapata Sprint Triathlon, download this sprint distance triathlon training plan and toe the start line with confidence.

Matthews has won or placed at numerous IRONMANs and 70.3s. He broke onto the triathlon scene at the 2014 IRONMAN Asia Pacific Championship in Melbourne. The native Australian finished 2nd in his home country with a time of 8:02:14. He has also won some Austin races, including Rookie Triathlon and Jack’s Generic Triathlon. His coaching style provides triathletes with a blend of knowledge he’s learned first-hand and what he’s been taught from other world-class triathletes.

This downloadable training plan is geared for triathletes who want to complete their first or second sprint distance triathlon. It’s also ideal for triathletes who want to set a PR. You can further customize this training plan yourself by adjusting the specific workouts and their days to fit your busy life.

After you download Barny’s free training plan, click on the day’s workout to learn about the workout’s description. Each daily workout has been conveniently hyperlinked to the workout. This allows you to know precisely what you need to complete that day. This is handy if you have to switch days based on your hectic schedule!

Pro tip: when you have a rest day, take it!

If you want to take your training to the next level, then contact Matthews today. Make sure you ask for his special Kerrville Tri coaching rate! Follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to see where he’s training and join him for a workout.

Enter your email to download the entire training plan!

July sprint distance triathlon training plan for Debra Zapata Sprint Triathlon.

August sprint distance triathlon training plan for Debra Zapata Sprint Triathlon.

September sprint distance triathlon training plan for Debra Zapata Sprint Triathlon.