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These 4 places provide some of the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes

The Texas Hill Country has an endless amount of spectacular views. That’s why Kerrville Tri is known as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas! These 4 places provide amazing sights or they’re really close to places you’ll want to visit. They’re also the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes and their families during race weekend. Pro tip: don’t wait too long to book your race weekend stay because these spots fill up quickly. While you continue to focus on your training, we’ll break down the best Kerrville lodging for you. Check out this interactive Google Map to see where they’re located!

Inn of the Hills

Credit – Inn of the Hills

This historic hotel is Kerrville Tri’s host hotel once again. It’s home to the 2-day Packet Pick Up and Expo and located within walking distance of swim start (Nimitz Lake) and Transition One (T1). In addition to being the host hotel and the center of Kerrville Triathlon, Inn of the Hills is located near many Hill Country attractions.

It’s within driving distance of downtown Kerrville, Riverside Nature Center, Kerr Arts and Cultural Center, Museum of Western Art, and Stonehenge II. Pro tip: Inn of the Hills is completely available to Kerrville Tri participants and their families for $118/night using this specific link. On Friday, September 3rd, available rooms will open to everyone else.

***7/28 UPDATE – Inn of the Hill is sold out for Saturday night. They have 36 rooms left for Friday night ONLY.

YO Ranch Hotel

Credit – YO Ranch

Turn the luxury meter up when you book with the Kerrville Tri block at the YO Ranch Hotel. It’s located near I-10, just 3.5 miles from Inn of the Hills and Packet Pick Up. You can relax before or after your race at the massive pool. If you’re celebrating with friends after the race, the swim-up bar is the place to be!

Extend your stay and take advantage of their connections to local wineries, golf courses, and places to ride horses. Pro tip: reserve your room for $118/night using this specific link before the August 24th cutoff date. Hurry because rooms are limited and going quickly.

Kerrville-Schreiner Park

Credit – Kerrville CVB

Want some more space and a little more nature? Kerrville’s largest municipal park has 517 acres and is nestled right next to Kerrville Lake. It’s also 4.8 miles from Inn of the Hills. No matter your lodging preference, Kerrville-Schreiner Park has you covered.

They have tent camping, 30- and 50-amp RV sites, cabins, and a ranch house. There’s so much to do when you’re not swimming, biking, and running. Take your pick of hike and bike trails, sand volleyball courts, kayak or canoe rentals, fishing, and more.

By the River RV Park and Campground

Credit – By the River RV Park and Campground

This 65-acre spot is family-owned and operated, next to the Guadalupe River, and 4 miles to the west of Inn of the Hills. By the River RV Park and Campground is also ideal for triathletes who want to enjoy nature and outdoor activities.

They have 30- and 50-amp RV sites or you can pitch your tent on their 22-acre island. With 2000 feet of shoreline, there’s plenty of space for swimming, kayaking, fishing, or floating. Bring your camera and capture some amazing sunsets!

Don’t wait any longer! Make your reservation at the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes before spots fill up. These 4 spots have something for everyone, whether you want the comfort of a hotel or the spaciousness of the great outdoors. And the best part? Everything is located within less than 5 miles from all the Kerrville Tri action.

Anyone who says “you can’t” complete a triathlon is wrong

No one should tell you that you can’t do something. Ever. This blog post will inspire people who want to train for a triathlon, but have been told in some way they shouldn’t. Triathlons are tough and require training, but don’t let anyone stop you from doing what your heart desires! Remember, anyone who says “you can’t” complete a triathlon is wrong; YOU CAN! These 11 steps will guide future triathletes through the process of preparing for their first race. For an extra boost, print out the PDF below and place it where you’ll see it every day!

11 beneficial steps for future triathletes

Find your heart’s desire

Why do you want to do this? Are you looking for structure that’ll lead to a healthy and active lifestyle? Let’s say you want to do it because you think you might like to be part of an active community. You’ve discovered that you really enjoy training with other people. You enjoy the challenge of pushing yourself and getting out of your comfort zone. As a social person, you like to be around other people more often than not. There are lots of reasons, find yours. That’s your starting point! 

Create a plan to reach that goal

Do you want to do an Olympic triathlon? A sprint or half distance? Your training time frame is dependent upon the distance you want to complete. You’ll need at least 3 months to prepare for a sprint triathlon. If you’re thinking about your first half-distance triathlon, you’ll probably need a year. Once you determine your goal distance and training time frame, you should decide if you have a set finishing goal time or if your goal is to finish and have fun. Once you have your goal, there are tons of free online training plans or you can hire a professional coach.

Join a club or training group

There are plenty of groups around the world who will help you. Check your local community too. Chances are there’s a group that meets up for swims, rides, runs, and brick workouts. If there isn’t one in your area, start a group. It’s a great way to connect with other people who share your interest.

Register for a distance you’re comfortable with

If you’re just starting out, Kerrville Tri’s Rookie sprint distance is perfect. The Rookie distance includes a 300m swim, 14-mile bike ride, and 2-mile run. It’s an introductory distance that’s an ideal starting point and doesn’t require a longer training time frame. The shorter distance will give you the confidence to try a longer distance later. Check with your club or group, they might have discounts or a code that you may not know about. 

Get the right gear for your triathlon

Join a triathlon group to meet other triathletes. Credit – Tom Marek

You’ll need a good bike and the right gear for training and competing. Train in the type of gear you’ll wear on race day. It’ll help you get comfortable with items like goggles, a wetsuit, or elastic laces in your running shoes. Make sure you buy a bike that fits you and your needs. Chances are there’s a bike shop near you that can help you find the perfect ride. Don’t start shopping until you read these bike buying dos and don’ts.

Set smaller, attainable goals 

An example of a small goal when first starting out might be “Run my first mile without stopping.” Another example might be “Complete 2 swim workouts every week.” You could also “Work on bike skills” during a ride. Once these short-term goals become habits, set new ones that are slightly bigger so you can progressively work towards completing your future race! Remember: you have the power to change your body through exercise

Eat healthier and take care of your body

A well-balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, and protein is an excellent starting point for a healthier diet. You can’t out-train bad eating habits and you’ll need the energy for training. Don’t skip meals or count calories while training. Stay active during your non-training time. Take walks, foam roll, or ride bikes with friends if you want to stay active on rest days. These are excellent habits to establish before, during, and after training. Don’t underestimate the importance of rest days!

Engage online

Find inspiration when you engage on social media with the event you’re training for and the different triathlon communities. If you’re not sure where to start, join the Kerrville Triathlon Facebook Group and follow us on Instagram. Comment on posts with questions or request blog topics that you think would be helpful in your journey.

Make a video or photo diary of your first triathlon

Enjoy race day and your triathlon journey. Credit – Tom Marek

This is a great way to document your progress and inspire others who have been following your journey.  Share it on Instagram, Facebook, or any other social media account that would be helpful in reaching people who are looking for inspiration. This is also a great way to look back on your experience in its entirety. Plus, it’s a nice little reminder for the people who said you can’t complete a triathlon!

Build on your success

Don’t let bad days get you down, they happen. Miss a training day – no problem. Just pick up where you left off and keep going. Feeling under the weather? Take a day off. It’s important to keep the momentum going. Building on your success extends beyond training to the finish line. Once you achieve your main goal, don’t stop there. Find your next event and keep the training train rolling!

Enjoy the journey and create a life you’ll love

You never know what you’re capable of until you do it. Training for a triathlon can lead to a life that is full of amazing and supportive people, healthy habits, and a consistent confidence booster. Keep in mind that your smaller goals will lead to your main goal. Think of them as building blocks. Enjoy the journey because you’ll never train for your first triathlon after you cross the finish line. 

Don’t let people tell you “you can’t.” Get inspired and train for a triathlon! You have the power to change your life through exercise. Training for a triathlon isn’t easy. Plan well, avoid these 6 mistakes, and be strategic so  you can get your body ready to crush it. And if all of these things sound too hard? Let us know. Our team would love to share our expertise and help get you to the start line!

Keep your training on track when you avoid these common foot problems

Triathlon is one of the most demanding sports. You push your body to the limit in training and on race day in pursuit of your goals. Regardless of the demands and whether you’re a first-timer or a veteran, you love the sport and its community to keep coming back for more. Swimming, cycling, running, and even changing in transition can put tremendous pressure on every muscle and bone in the body. One of the most impacted areas can be your feet and ankles. They’re primarily involved in everything you do. As a result, common foot problems can arise. These can range from a minor annoyance during training to an issue that sidelines you for weeks. The following 3 common foot problems often arise from excessive pressure due to rigorous training. These 4 exercises can help with balance training and strengthening your feet and ankles.

Achilles tendonitis

Avoid common foot problems and you’ll smile all the way to the finish line.

Tendons are fibrous tissues that connect muscles and bones. There are tendons all over our body and continuous wear and tear can lead to inflammation. This is also known as tendonitis. This is one of the more common foot problems since all three triathlon activities put a strain on the tendons. Running puts the most strain on your feet because of its repetitive nature. Swimming and cycling don’t create as much pressure, but your feet are instrumental for each discipline. Swimming and cycling are great ways to strengthen your feet, which is beneficial for running.

Shin splints

This is one of the more common and unwanted foot problems. It can range from muscle soreness to a stress fracture. Although there are several causes for this condition, two of the most common are old, worn-out running shoes and excessive training. Shin splints are most commonly associated with running. They can make things quite painful. If you experience shin splints, you can probably still ride your bike and swim, but you should probably skip a run or two. Reduce your chances of experiencing shin splints with this advice

Blisters

Blisters are painful, but they shouldn’t keep you from cross the finish line.

This is arguably the most common foot problem that triathletes experience. Blisters are a result of excessive friction between the feet and your shoes. They’ll mainly appear on your toes or the bottoms of your feet. Excessive moisture is typically the culprit, whether that be from sweat or water from the swim. But excessive rubbing of skin over a long period of time can also cause blisters to form. While blisters may not derail your training, they can be an inconvenience and cause pain.

Training for a triathlon is challenging and demanding. Every swim, ride, and run is important to achieving your goals. Your training should include enough time for your body to relax and recover, especially your feet and ankles. This is key to avoiding common foot problems. When your training plan calls for a rest day take it! They’re just as vital as any brick workout or long bike ride.

Learn about the 6 mistakes to avoid on your journey to the start line

Triathlon is an exciting sport that will test your limits, push your boundaries, and make you a better athlete. It consists of completing three activities – swimming, biking, and running – in a row. As with any new endeavor, there will be several unknowns and some mistakes along the way. It’s only natural! For those training for their first triathlon, one of your training and race day goals should be to keep the mistakes to a minimum. Learn about the 6 mistakes to avoid below. Doing so can make training that much easier and help you be even more successful on race day.

Make sure you avoid these 6 mistakes

Set unrealistic goals

Choose a short-distance tri, like the Kerrville Tri Rookie Sprint, for your first triathlon.

View your first triathlon as an opportunity to explore the sport, meet new people, and learn something new. Setting unrealistic goals when you first start can cause stress and lead to disappointment and frustration. These goals could include finishing in a super-fast time or taking on a long-distance triathlon.

Instead, choose a short-distance triathlon, like the Kerrville Tri Rookie Sprint, for your first one. It consists of a 300m swim, 14-mile bike ride, and 2-mile run. This will allow you to learn about the nuances of triathlon while incorporating short-distance training. Set smaller, weekly goals that lead up to your main goal. This will keep you motivated.

Overlook nutrition and hydration

Don’t forget about what your body needs to propel you during your first triathlon: fuel. This includes nutrition and hydration. And we’re not just talking about training and race day. This includes all the meals you eat and what you drink. If you’re not a healthy eater, now’s the time to make the switch. Include more lean meats, fruits, and vegetables. Drink more water and electrolyte-enhanced drinks. 

A well-rounded training plan will better prepare you for race day.

You need to know what your body will need on race day before race day. Test out what nutrition and hydration work best for you during training. Find your favorites and stick with them! This helpful nutrition guide will get you started.

Ignore a weakness during training

Focusing on your strengths will improve your performance for those specific activities. But focusing on your weakness is crucial to becoming a well-rounded triathlete.

For example, you might’ve grown up swimming, but aren’t that good at cycling. If this is the case, your training should focus more on getting better at cycling. This could include building your endurance, practicing bike skills, or learning the rules of the road. Don’t completely ignore swimming, just substitute a few swim workouts for bike rides.

Exclude triathlon gear

Remember: nothing new on race day!

Whether swimming, cycling, or running, triathlon gear is designed to improve performance and make you comfortable. You don’t need expensive equipment for your first triathlon, but you need gear that’s reliable and trustworthy. For example, a tri suit isn’t mandatory, but it’s something you can wear throughout your first triathlon. However, you will want swim goggles and a bike. If you’re in the market, read these bike buying dos and don’ts and learn how to find swim goggles that are right for you.

Try something new on the race day

Race day is not the time for experimentation. This includes gear, nutrition, hydration, and form/technique. Nothing new on race day! Trying something new on race day can result in issues that can affect your performance or worse, cause injury. What you use on race day should be tested multiple times during training. You should be completely comfortable with everything before race day rolls around.

Arrive late

Another reason to arrive early: a group photo.

With so much to do in transition, you want to arrive early. You should be parked and headed to transition at least an hour before it closes, if not earlier. Give yourself enough time to set up in transition and become familiar with all the entrances and exits. When leaving your place, plan for traffic, rookie stress, and parking. Pro tip: practice setting up transition the night before and double-check everything when packing!

Learning about these 6 mistakes to avoid will save you time, reduce stress, and help you be successful during your first triathlon. This advice will stay with you during your entire triathlon journey.

Partnership names Zone3 USA the Official Triathlon and Swim Gear

High Five Events, one of the largest privately owned event production companies in the United States, announces a two-year agreement with Zone3 USA. The partnership makes Zone3 USA the Official Triathlon and Swim Gear of CapTex Triathlon presented by Life Time and Kerrville Triathlon Festival.

“We can’t wait to be back to racing and spending time with the endurance sports community,” said Ryan Dolan, President of Zone3 USA. “High Five Events has produced high-quality, community-based events for a long time and we’re excited to partner with them for CapTex Tri and Kerrville Triathlon.”

Zone3’s involvement

Zone3 USA, one of the most loved and chosen specialist sport brands around the world, is headquartered in Boulder, Colorado. The partnership means all participants will receive Zone3’s silicone swim caps that are long-lasting and eco-friendly. They will also host product demos at both expos and provide triathlon insight for blogs and social media.

“Zone3 is one of the most recognized brands in the world and this partnership will continue to elevate the profiles of CapTex and Kerrville Tri,” said Jack Murray, co-owner of High Five Events. “What really impressed us in our initial conversations with Zone3 was the depth and quality of their product line and their commitment to building a relationship with our endurance community.”

CapTex Tri will take place on Memorial Day, Monday, May 31st, in downtown Austin. Kerrville Triathlon will celebrate its 10th anniversary on September 25-26th, in Kerrville, Texas.

Learn about aqua jogging and how it can keep you going

Running is a critical component of all training plans and its one-third of triathlon. It’s also the leading recreational and competitive sport that results in some form of injury. This includes sprains, plantar fasciitis, patellofemoral pain syndrome, stress fracture, etc. and they happen to everyone. There’s good news for triathletes experiencing a running-related injury in that they can keep training with aqua jogging. This is an effective form of training that will help you continue training and improve your cardio fitness. Aqua jogging provides a beneficial alternative to running without worsening an existing injury or increasing the stress on your joints. It’s also a great addition to your first 70.3 training plan or the perfect alternative to a 60-minute run.

Aqua jogging explained

Also called deep water running, this is a cardio exercise that is similar to jogging underwater. It’s performed two ways:

–      running laps in the shallow end of a pool

–      wearing a flotation belt around your midsection and jogging in deeper water

The flotation belt keeps you suspended in deeper water so your legs and arms move freely and mimic running. Your head remains above the water during aqua jogging so you can focus on your breathing as if you were running. Both of these can also be done using light, water-proof weights.

Benefits of aqua jogging

1) Injury rehab

This is a top training choice for injured runners. When wearing a flotation device, aqua jogging takes all the pressure off your lower body. It enables you to work out without experiencing any discomfort or pain from your injury. If you’re running in a shallow pool, the impact on your lower body will be significantly reduced.

2) Triathlon training

An important feature of aqua jogging is that it replicates running on land. Triathletes include this even if they aren’t injured, especially before or after a swim. You’re already in the water and you can continue to improve your cardio output and increase your muscle strength. Think of it as a brick workout! It also helps you maintain your running form and posture, while reducing the wear and tear on your lower body. Just like swimming, aqua jogging is a full-body workout that strengthens everything and helps you improve your balance.

3) General workouts

When you’re running in water the exertion is much less than on land. You don’t have to be injured or training for a triathlon to enjoy the benefits of aqua jogging. Incorporate it into your week and switch it out for a run. If you have a 60-minute run planned, try aqua jogging for 60 minutes. Your weekly mileage will be lower, but you’re still getting a significant workout without all the stress and pounding from running on the pavement.

Aqua jogging is the ideal alternative for injured athletes. But that’s not its only use! Add it to your training plan and turn your swim into a swim/aqua jog brick workout. And if you’re not training for anything specific, this particular exercise is a nice alternative to one of your weekly runs. Just because you’re not pounding the pavement doesn’t mean you can skip foam rolling. Take care of your body, even after spending time in the water, with these 4 effective foam rolling tips.

Learn to hydrate better with these 5 tips for triathletes

Water is the ultimate hydration for athletes, although it shouldn’t be your only hydration. You lose essential minerals when you sweat. Ensure you’re consuming enough electrolytes to replace what you lose. During physical activities like swimming, cycling, and running, dehydration can be a huge problem if you don’t hydrate properly. Triathletes can shed more water from their body compared to normal athletes, especially during prolonged or brick workouts. Knowing how you can hydrate better will go a long way in preventing dehydration, fatigue, and cramps. Learn to hydrate better as a triathlete when you review and adhere to the 5 tips below.

  1. Hydration timetable

Filling up your favorite water bottle several times a day will help you hydrate better.

You should create a schedule for fluid intake at regular intervals. Plan this according to your training and your day/week. Fill up your favorite water bottle and refill it throughout the day. Stick to this schedule and combine water and an electrolyte-based drink. Check with other triathletes and see what works for them. Keep in mind that your intake will differ based on your body composition, training plan, and how much you sweat. Remember that too much fluid intake can adversely affect your performance. If your training plan calls for you to increase your mileage, ensure you increase your hydration too.

  1. Add electrolytes

Proper hydration is necessary for maintaining the balance of electrolytes in your body. Essential electrolytes such as sodium and potassium are lost when you sweat. This can adversely affect your performance if you don’t properly hydrate prior to a workout and replace what you lost during the workout. Many specialty drinks with added electrolytes are available. Test some of them during strenuous workouts like brick workouts, find what works best for you, and stick with it. 

  1. Eat natural fruits

Watermelon is the perfect post-workout snack and will help you hydrate better.

Certain fruits are loaded with a lot of water and essential minerals. This will help in natural water replenishment and hydration. The additional mineral content also helps in balancing the electrolyte concentration. Fruits like watermelon and coconut are highly recommended for athletes. Treat yourself to these fruits when you take advantage of your rest days.

  1. Reduce caffeine

A cup of coffee might actually be beneficial. But you shouldn’t plan to drink a pot of coffee before a long workout or race day. It is a diuretic and can induce the need for passing urine frequently. Some electrolyte drinks will advertise that they have caffeine. The amount of caffeine in these electrolyte drinks might provide the same performance benefit as a cup of coffee. If you introduce new drinks, try them out with shorter workouts. You’ll know if they work for you and can adjust your intake for longer workouts. If you try new drinks on bike rides, follow this advice to get better at hydrating while cycling.

  1. Monitor food intake

Practice hydrating and cycling when finding the right hydration for you.

The water content in our body plays an important role in the digestion process. Certain types of foods are known for dehydrating your body. Processed foods and snacks with high salt content should be avoided in large quantities similar to caffeine. Nutrition with a small amount of salt isn’t detrimental as the salt could help replenish what you lose when you sweat. This will help your body to stay hydrated.

Training is the ideal time for you to research and test different hydrations. You’ll also need to learn what combination of water and an electrolyte-infused drink works best for you. These 5 tips will help you hydrate better, but at the end of the day it’s up to you to learn what works best for you.

Weather affects run performance, especially if you’re not prepared

Triathletes deal with different weather year-round while running. Mother Nature can be a force if you’re caught off guard. Weather affects run performance, especially in extreme conditions. Make sure you know about the ways in which weather affects run performance so you can adjust accordingly. Understanding these circumstances is helpful during training, especially as you begin to increase your mileage. The information below will help prepare you for whatever Mother Nature has in store during your run. 

Heat

Running in hot weather slows you down considerably. You have to exert more effort and the heat raises your heart rate. Dehydration can be an issue because your body will sweat more in an effort to keep you cool. High humidity can add to the thickness of the air, making it seem like it’s harder to breathe. You can still run during the warmer months as it could benefit you during the cooler months. Make sure you increase your hydration, replenish the electrolytes you lose, and dial back your pace. Here are some different ways to can carry hydration on your run. If your schedule allows, run in the morning or the evening when it’s cooler.

High winds

Everyone has been on a run where the wind goes against you no matter what direction you run. High winds can negatively affect your run performance and can act as a type of resistance training. They’ll slow you down, but just think that you’re getting stronger as a runner. High winds could also stir up dust and debris which could get in your eyes or impact your breathing, especially if you suffer from allergies. Check the air quality before you run and wear sunglasses to protect your eyes when you run.

Rain

For starters, your running pace suffers while running in rainy weather because you tend to run more cautiously. You may be apprehensive about slipping. Rain can soak your clothes, making them heavier. Soaked socks and shoes could lead to blisters. They’re a painful experience that nobody enjoys. If there’s lightning or a storm approaching with lightning do not start your run. If this happens mid-run, seek shelter immediately. If there’s a thunderstorm approaching, flip your run with a rest day and take advantage of the benefits.

Cold

Layer your clothes during a cold run so you can remove them and put them back on as needed.

As is the case with any kind of weather that affects run performance, it’s not just the outside temperature that matters. It’s more about how your body reacts to the weather that affects how you run. Your body generates heat when you run, so you shouldn’t feel too bad while running in the cold. The key is to properly layer so you can add and remove layers when necessary. You’ll more than likely encounter this weather because the training cycle is longer if you’re preparing for your first 70.3 distance. In colder temperatures, your body has to use more energy to keep vital organs warm. Blood vessels may constrict in the cold, reducing blood flow and the amount of fresh oxygen to your leg muscles.

Foggy/cloudy

Running in fog or when it’s cloudy can be risky. Visibility may be compromised in dense fog making it harder for you to see others or for others to see you. Run against traffic and wear reflective clothing. Don’t think you’ve got it made if it’s cloudy, the sun’s rays are still shining through. Apply sunscreen before a run and hydrate as you normally would. A false sense of security could lead to a nasty sunburn or thinking you don’t have to hydrate as much. 

4 exercises for triathletes that highlight the importance of balance training

If you are an athlete, then you know about the importance of balance training. Balance allows you to stay upright, generate power, and maintain your momentum. Balance is especially important for triathletes. See how important balance will be on race day when you build brick workouts into your training plan.

Even seasoned triathlete’s legs are wobbly when they begin the run.

Once you’ve finished the swim, you go from a horizontal to an upright position as you exit the water. When you’ve completed the bike ride, you go from a seated position pedaling to an upright position. Both of these transitions can make the most seasoned triathletes a little wobbly. Triathletes are mindful of the importance of balance training. It can provide the stability needed when transitioning. Add the 4 exercises below to your training to improve your balance.

Pro tip: once your comfortable with these exercises on the ground, add this Bosu Balance Trainer and take your balance training to the next level!

  1. Single-leg squat

Focus on maintaining a slow speed when squatting and coming up.

  • stand on your right leg with your left knee slightly bent (for balance)
  • bring your arms forward for balance, keep your back straight.
  • keep your left leg still, squat down focusing on the right leg
  • repeat 10 times for each leg
  1. Tree pose

Find something to focus on during a tree pose and stick with it.

The tree pose is a yoga posture that can be done on the floor or on a mat. Apart from improving balance, it strengthens your ankles.

  • stand upright with your spine straight
  • lift your left foot slowly to the side of the calf and place it on your right leg above or below the knee
  • raise your arms above your head, hold the pose for 30 seconds
  • switch legs
  1. Single-leg deadlift

Use dumbbells to further strengthen your hamstrings and glutes.

  • stand on your right leg with your left knee slightly bent (for balance)
  • bend down at the waist, keep your spine straight
  • as you come up, squeeze your hamstrings, abs, and glutes
  • repeat 10 times for each leg
  1. Planks

Focus on engaging your core when holding a plank.

Great way to strengthen your entire core. Increase the time as needed.

  • place your forearms on the ground parallel to each other
  • move your feet out to plank pose and squeeze the glutes
  • hold for 30 seconds (or longer)
  • repeat for 3 sets

The exercises explained above are simple, don’t need weights, and can be done at home. Don’t ignore the importance of balance training! Do these exercises daily and you will find your balance improving daily. Pair the exercises with this advice and learn how to hydrate better when cycling. If you’re crunched for time, these additional exercises can be completed during your lunch break.

Take advantage of rest days and speed up your recovery process

When training for a triathlon, the last thing you probably want to hear is that you need rest days. But rest days are crucial to your recovery. Not resting can actually get in the way of your success. Your body needs time to recover from the workouts and make the necessary repairs. This is even more imperative if your next triathlon is your first half. You’re following your training plan, swimming, cycling, and running. When your regimen calls for a rest day, take it! It will aid in your training and help your body increase its capabilities and stamina. Check out the 4 reasons why you should take advantage of rest days.

  • Give your body a break

If you don’t take rest days during training it can result in stress fractures, sprains, and overall poor performance. Training every day builds stress in your body. Alongside small microscopic tears in muscles that need time to heal, your body also starts to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol. Over time, this can lead to burn-out, mental fatigue, and physical injuries. Give yourself a break mentally and physically. Pro tip: learn how brick workouts can help you prepare for race day and schedule your off day after them.

  • Speed up your recovery

Yoga on your rest day can aid in your body’s recovery process.

Planned rest days are a core part of your triathlon training, especially as you’re increasing your mileage. If you are constantly training, your body can’t utilize the rest it needs to repair itself. Over time, this will begin to degrade your muscles. By taking rest days when you’re supposed to you can speed up your recovery process. If you feel like you need to do something on these days, try foam rolling or yoga. Both are low-impact options that can keep you busy and aid in your body’s recovery.

  • Catch up on life

Training is a time-consuming process that requires commitment and hard work. But becoming too invested could keep you apart from the other parts of your life that truly matter. Spend your rest day catching up on chores or errands that need to be done. Spend time with friends and family. They’re supporting your training and will be there for you on race day!

Get outside and spend time with your family on your rest day.

You could also catch up on something you enjoy that’s been put to the side during training. All of these provide you with a physical and mental break from training. You’ll thank yourself later.

  • Stay on track

Before selecting a training plan, make sure you know the basics about all triathlon distances. When building your plan, make sure you add rest days to it. Whether you’re training with a coach or just surfed the web to find a plan, everyone advises taking rest days. There are good reasons for this. They are strategically built in to give your body a break, make repairs, and prepare you for the next set of workouts. Stick to your training plan so you can keep progressing as a triathlete. 

Triathletes that incorporate rest days into their training find the best results over the long term. They’re more than just a break from training. Rest days provide your body an opportunity to heal and repair the muscles used. They also provide a mental break so you can holistically recover. As race day approaches, make sure you’re completed prepared by knowing what to expect at your first triathlon.