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Free, personalized finish line video stems from expanded partnership with FinisherPix

The Kerrville Triathlon Festival will provide a free, personalized finish line video for all participants as part of its 10th anniversary on September 25-26. This video, valued at $19, will be added to a list of perks that are already in place for the event. Participants receive limited-edition 10th-anniversary swim floats, tri-blend shirts, reusable water bottles, belt buckle finisher medals, personalized race bibs, Zone 3 silicone swim caps, and a post-race meal. 

The popular destination triathlon, known for its scenic views and fun atmosphere, is expecting record numbers that could see the event sell out. Participants are encouraged to register before the next price increase on Wednesday, August 4th, at 11:59 p.m. CST. 

“Participants are ready to make new memories and we know they’ll love their free, personalized finish line video,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “We’re so excited to celebrate 10 years of this event and watch it continue to grow as a bucket list triathlon for both beginners and experienced athletes!” 

10 years of swimming, biking, and running

The free, personalized finish line video will be produced by FinisherPix. It’ll include highlights of participants crossing the finish line and commemorative 10th-anniversary designs and footage. Additional FinisherPix photo packages can be purchased at a discounted rate during the registration process

“Crossing the Kerrville Tri finish line is a memorable experience and this is a great way for participants to share this moment with friends and family,” said Robbie Little, Vice President, Event Services at Outside.

Kerrville Tri offers distances and events for triathletes of all levels and abilities. The Rookie Sprint distance, aquabike, relay, and kids fun run take place on Saturday, September 25th. Quarter distance, quarter aquabike, half distance, half aquabike, and half relay will all happen on Sunday, September 26th. Participants can pick up their packet at the Kerrville Triathlon Expo, which is free and open to the public. It’ll take place on September 24-25 at Inn of the Hills Hotels.

Kerrville Tri, known as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas, features a swim course in Nimitz Lake, bike course through the Texas Hill Country, and run course along the Guadalupe River. Participants can also enjoy floating in the Guadalupe river after the race as part of the post-race festival. Kerrville Tri is a USAT-sanction event, provides professional timing, and offers professional photography. A great volunteer crew, hundreds of supportive spectators, and an energetic finish line festival make race weekend memorable for everyone involved. 

These 4 places provide some of the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes

The Texas Hill Country has an endless amount of spectacular views. That’s why Kerrville Tri is known as The Most Scenic Triathlon in Texas! These 4 places provide amazing sights or they’re really close to places you’ll want to visit. They’re also the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes and their families during race weekend. Pro tip: don’t wait too long to book your race weekend stay because these spots fill up quickly. While you continue to focus on your training, we’ll break down the best Kerrville lodging for you. Check out this interactive Google Map to see where they’re located!

Inn of the Hills

Credit – Inn of the Hills

This historic hotel is Kerrville Tri’s host hotel once again. It’s home to the 2-day Packet Pick Up and Expo and located within walking distance of swim start (Nimitz Lake) and Transition One (T1). In addition to being the host hotel and the center of Kerrville Triathlon, Inn of the Hills is located near many Hill Country attractions.

It’s within driving distance of downtown Kerrville, Riverside Nature Center, Kerr Arts and Cultural Center, Museum of Western Art, and Stonehenge II. Pro tip: Inn of the Hills is completely available to Kerrville Tri participants and their families for $118/night using this specific link. On Friday, September 3rd, available rooms will open to everyone else.

YO Ranch Hotel

Credit – YO Ranch

Turn the luxury meter up when you book with the Kerrville Tri block at the YO Ranch Hotel. It’s located near I-10, just 3.5 miles from Inn of the Hills and Packet Pick Up. You can relax before or after your race at the massive pool. If you’re celebrating with friends after the race, the swim-up bar is the place to be!

Extend your stay and take advantage of their connections to local wineries, golf courses, and places to ride horses. Pro tip: reserve your room for $118/night using this specific link before the August 24th cutoff date. Hurry because rooms are limited and going quickly.

Kerrville-Schreiner Park

Credit – Kerrville CVB

Want some more space and a little more nature? Kerrville’s largest municipal park has 517 acres and is nestled right next to Kerrville Lake. It’s also 4.8 miles from Inn of the Hills. No matter your lodging preference, Kerrville-Schreiner Park has you covered.

They have tent camping, 30- and 50-amp RV sites, cabins, and a ranch house. There’s so much to do when you’re not swimming, biking, and running. Take your pick of hike and bike trails, sand volleyball courts, kayak or canoe rentals, fishing, and more.

By the River RV Park and Campground

Credit – By the River RV Park and Campground

This 65-acre spot is family-owned and operated, next to the Guadalupe River, and 4 miles to the west of Inn of the Hills. By the River RV Park and Campground is also ideal for triathletes who want to enjoy nature and outdoor activities.

They have 30- and 50-amp RV sites or you can pitch your tent on their 22-acre island. With 2000 feet of shoreline, there’s plenty of space for swimming, kayaking, fishing, or floating. Bring your camera and capture some amazing sunsets!

Don’t wait any longer! Make your reservation at the best Kerrville lodging for triathletes before spots fill up. These 4 spots have something for everyone, whether you want the comfort of a hotel or the spaciousness of the great outdoors. And the best part? Everything is located within less than 5 miles from all the Kerrville Tri action.

Anyone who says “you can’t” complete a triathlon is wrong

No one should tell you that you can’t do something. Ever. This blog post will inspire people who want to train for a triathlon, but have been told in some way they shouldn’t. Triathlons are tough and require training, but don’t let anyone stop you from doing what your heart desires! Remember, anyone who says “you can’t” complete a triathlon is wrong; YOU CAN! These 11 steps will guide future triathletes through the process of preparing for their first race. For an extra boost, print out the PDF below and place it where you’ll see it every day!

11 beneficial steps for future triathletes

Find your heart’s desire

Why do you want to do this? Are you looking for structure that’ll lead to a healthy and active lifestyle? Let’s say you want to do it because you think you might like to be part of an active community. You’ve discovered that you really enjoy training with other people. You enjoy the challenge of pushing yourself and getting out of your comfort zone. As a social person, you like to be around other people more often than not. There are lots of reasons, find yours. That’s your starting point! 

Create a plan to reach that goal

Do you want to do an Olympic triathlon? A sprint or half distance? Your training time frame is dependent upon the distance you want to complete. You’ll need at least 3 months to prepare for a sprint triathlon. If you’re thinking about your first half-distance triathlon, you’ll probably need a year. Once you determine your goal distance and training time frame, you should decide if you have a set finishing goal time or if your goal is to finish and have fun. Once you have your goal, there are tons of free online training plans or you can hire a professional coach.

Join a club or training group

There are plenty of groups around the world who will help you. Check your local community too. Chances are there’s a group that meets up for swims, rides, runs, and brick workouts. If there isn’t one in your area, start a group. It’s a great way to connect with other people who share your interest.

Register for a distance you’re comfortable with

If you’re just starting out, Kerrville Tri’s Rookie sprint distance is perfect. The Rookie distance includes a 300m swim, 14-mile bike ride, and 2-mile run. It’s an introductory distance that’s an ideal starting point and doesn’t require a longer training time frame. The shorter distance will give you the confidence to try a longer distance later. Check with your club or group, they might have discounts or a code that you may not know about. 

Get the right gear for your triathlon

Join a triathlon group to meet other triathletes. Credit – Tom Marek

You’ll need a good bike and the right gear for training and competing. Train in the type of gear you’ll wear on race day. It’ll help you get comfortable with items like goggles, a wetsuit, or elastic laces in your running shoes. Make sure you buy a bike that fits you and your needs. Chances are there’s a bike shop near you that can help you find the perfect ride. Don’t start shopping until you read these bike buying dos and don’ts.

Set smaller, attainable goals 

An example of a small goal when first starting out might be “Run my first mile without stopping.” Another example might be “Complete 2 swim workouts every week.” You could also “Work on bike skills” during a ride. Once these short-term goals become habits, set new ones that are slightly bigger so you can progressively work towards completing your future race! Remember: you have the power to change your body through exercise

Eat healthier and take care of your body

A well-balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, and protein is an excellent starting point for a healthier diet. You can’t out-train bad eating habits and you’ll need the energy for training. Don’t skip meals or count calories while training. Stay active during your non-training time. Take walks, foam roll, or ride bikes with friends if you want to stay active on rest days. These are excellent habits to establish before, during, and after training. Don’t underestimate the importance of rest days!

Engage online

Find inspiration when you engage on social media with the event you’re training for and the different triathlon communities. If you’re not sure where to start, join the Kerrville Triathlon Facebook Group and follow us on Instagram. Comment on posts with questions or request blog topics that you think would be helpful in your journey.

Make a video or photo diary of your first triathlon

Enjoy race day and your triathlon journey. Credit – Tom Marek

This is a great way to document your progress and inspire others who have been following your journey.  Share it on Instagram, Facebook, or any other social media account that would be helpful in reaching people who are looking for inspiration. This is also a great way to look back on your experience in its entirety. Plus, it’s a nice little reminder for the people who said you can’t complete a triathlon!

Build on your success

Don’t let bad days get you down, they happen. Miss a training day – no problem. Just pick up where you left off and keep going. Feeling under the weather? Take a day off. It’s important to keep the momentum going. Building on your success extends beyond training to the finish line. Once you achieve your main goal, don’t stop there. Find your next event and keep the training train rolling!

Enjoy the journey and create a life you’ll love

You never know what you’re capable of until you do it. Training for a triathlon can lead to a life that is full of amazing and supportive people, healthy habits, and a consistent confidence booster. Keep in mind that your smaller goals will lead to your main goal. Think of them as building blocks. Enjoy the journey because you’ll never train for your first triathlon after you cross the finish line. 

Don’t let people tell you “you can’t.” Get inspired and train for a triathlon! You have the power to change your life through exercise. Training for a triathlon isn’t easy. Plan well, avoid these 6 mistakes, and be strategic so  you can get your body ready to crush it. And if all of these things sound too hard? Let us know. Our team would love to share our expertise and help get you to the start line!

Keep your training on track when you avoid these common foot problems

Triathlon is one of the most demanding sports. You push your body to the limit in training and on race day in pursuit of your goals. Regardless of the demands and whether you’re a first-timer or a veteran, you love the sport and its community to keep coming back for more. Swimming, cycling, running, and even changing in transition can put tremendous pressure on every muscle and bone in the body. One of the most impacted areas can be your feet and ankles. They’re primarily involved in everything you do. As a result, common foot problems can arise. These can range from a minor annoyance during training to an issue that sidelines you for weeks. The following 3 common foot problems often arise from excessive pressure due to rigorous training. These 4 exercises can help with balance training and strengthening your feet and ankles.

Achilles tendonitis

Avoid common foot problems and you’ll smile all the way to the finish line.

Tendons are fibrous tissues that connect muscles and bones. There are tendons all over our body and continuous wear and tear can lead to inflammation. This is also known as tendonitis. This is one of the more common foot problems since all three triathlon activities put a strain on the tendons. Running puts the most strain on your feet because of its repetitive nature. Swimming and cycling don’t create as much pressure, but your feet are instrumental for each discipline. Swimming and cycling are great ways to strengthen your feet, which is beneficial for running.

Shin splints

This is one of the more common and unwanted foot problems. It can range from muscle soreness to a stress fracture. Although there are several causes for this condition, two of the most common are old, worn-out running shoes and excessive training. Shin splints are most commonly associated with running. They can make things quite painful. If you experience shin splints, you can probably still ride your bike and swim, but you should probably skip a run or two. Reduce your chances of experiencing shin splints with this advice

Blisters

Blisters are painful, but they shouldn’t keep you from cross the finish line.

This is arguably the most common foot problem that triathletes experience. Blisters are a result of excessive friction between the feet and your shoes. They’ll mainly appear on your toes or the bottoms of your feet. Excessive moisture is typically the culprit, whether that be from sweat or water from the swim. But excessive rubbing of skin over a long period of time can also cause blisters to form. While blisters may not derail your training, they can be an inconvenience and cause pain.

Training for a triathlon is challenging and demanding. Every swim, ride, and run is important to achieving your goals. Your training should include enough time for your body to relax and recover, especially your feet and ankles. This is key to avoiding common foot problems. When your training plan calls for a rest day take it! They’re just as vital as any brick workout or long bike ride.

Learn about the 6 mistakes to avoid on your journey to the start line

Triathlon is an exciting sport that will test your limits, push your boundaries, and make you a better athlete. It consists of completing three activities – swimming, biking, and running – in a row. As with any new endeavor, there will be several unknowns and some mistakes along the way. It’s only natural! For those training for their first triathlon, one of your training and race day goals should be to keep the mistakes to a minimum. Learn about the 6 mistakes to avoid below. Doing so can make training that much easier and help you be even more successful on race day.

Make sure you avoid these 6 mistakes

Set unrealistic goals

Choose a short-distance tri, like the Kerrville Tri Rookie Sprint, for your first triathlon.

View your first triathlon as an opportunity to explore the sport, meet new people, and learn something new. Setting unrealistic goals when you first start can cause stress and lead to disappointment and frustration. These goals could include finishing in a super-fast time or taking on a long-distance triathlon.

Instead, choose a short-distance triathlon, like the Kerrville Tri Rookie Sprint, for your first one. It consists of a 300m swim, 14-mile bike ride, and 2-mile run. This will allow you to learn about the nuances of triathlon while incorporating short-distance training. Set smaller, weekly goals that lead up to your main goal. This will keep you motivated.

Overlook nutrition and hydration

Don’t forget about what your body needs to propel you during your first triathlon: fuel. This includes nutrition and hydration. And we’re not just talking about training and race day. This includes all the meals you eat and what you drink. If you’re not a healthy eater, now’s the time to make the switch. Include more lean meats, fruits, and vegetables. Drink more water and electrolyte-enhanced drinks. 

A well-rounded training plan will better prepare you for race day.

You need to know what your body will need on race day before race day. Test out what nutrition and hydration work best for you during training. Find your favorites and stick with them! This helpful nutrition guide will get you started.

Ignore a weakness during training

Focusing on your strengths will improve your performance for those specific activities. But focusing on your weakness is crucial to becoming a well-rounded triathlete.

For example, you might’ve grown up swimming, but aren’t that good at cycling. If this is the case, your training should focus more on getting better at cycling. This could include building your endurance, practicing bike skills, or learning the rules of the road. Don’t completely ignore swimming, just substitute a few swim workouts for bike rides.

Exclude triathlon gear

Remember: nothing new on race day!

Whether swimming, cycling, or running, triathlon gear is designed to improve performance and make you comfortable. You don’t need expensive equipment for your first triathlon, but you need gear that’s reliable and trustworthy. For example, a tri suit isn’t mandatory, but it’s something you can wear throughout your first triathlon. However, you will want swim goggles and a bike. If you’re in the market, read these bike buying dos and don’ts and learn how to find swim goggles that are right for you.

Try something new on the race day

Race day is not the time for experimentation. This includes gear, nutrition, hydration, and form/technique. Nothing new on race day! Trying something new on race day can result in issues that can affect your performance or worse, cause injury. What you use on race day should be tested multiple times during training. You should be completely comfortable with everything before race day rolls around.

Arrive late

Another reason to arrive early: a group photo.

With so much to do in transition, you want to arrive early. You should be parked and headed to transition at least an hour before it closes, if not earlier. Give yourself enough time to set up in transition and become familiar with all the entrances and exits. When leaving your place, plan for traffic, rookie stress, and parking. Pro tip: practice setting up transition the night before and double-check everything when packing!

Learning about these 6 mistakes to avoid will save you time, reduce stress, and help you be successful during your first triathlon. This advice will stay with you during your entire triathlon journey.

Follow our advice to get better at hydrating while cycling

If you’re new to cycling, one of the challenges to get accustomed to is knowing how to drink water while peddling. Just as there is skill needed to balance, ride curves, and pump uphills, technique is needed to hydrate without losing your balance and falling off your bike. Here are some tips for hydrating while cycling.

Use a squirt-top bottle instead of a cap bottle

A water bottle with a cap requires you to twist it open, which is cumbersome to do with one hand on a bike. When it comes to squirt-top bottles, you can simply use your teeth to open the valve and start drinking with one hand as you control your bike with the other. The convenience a squirt-top bottle offers during cycling allows you to focus on the course more and avoid any accident.

Make use of the bottle cage on your bike

To carry water on the road, you can use a bottle cage on your bike. The bottle cage can be installed between the bars, on the frame, or near the saddle to help you reach your drink with zero fuss. Here are the pros and cons of each bottle cage.

Aero Bottle Cage

This type of cage is designed so that it can be attached to multiple parts of the bike frame. Most other cages can only be mounted to the frame.

Pros
– easiest to access
– option to install it either vertical or horizontal
– using horizontal bottles at the front can decrease aerodynamic drag

Cons
– poor aerodynamics compared to other cages
– using vertical bottles can cause even higher aerodynamic drag.

Bike Frame Cage

These are very common bottle holders that can be placed on the frame, seat post, or handlebars.

Pros
– slim aero bottles on the down tube are less affected by drag and side wind.

Cons
– intermediate aerodynamic drag
– large frame-mounted bottles are expensive and difficult to clean.

Rear Hydration System

This is an aerodynamic bottle that is mounted behind the seat post. These are more so used by competitive triathletes partaking in very long distances.

Pros
– best choice in terms of aerodynamics
– least affected by side wind

Cons
– requires a cage with a strong grip to prevent bottle-launching
– must be made of a favorable material to oppose side sway

Take advantage of the straight-aways

Think about when the ideal time to take a sip is and be ready to do so. Trying to pull the water bottle out on curves is much more challenging, so wait until the trail is flat and straight to get your drink.

Practice, Practice, Practice

Ride up and down your street over and over and practice. Pull your water bottle out of the cage, take a sip, then put it back while moving forward. Start off slow and pick up speed as you get more comfortable.

Pro Tip: Avoid quenching your thirst in one go

Kerrville TriathlonExerting your body through exercise causes dehydration which makes you thirsty. Despite your desire to rapidly quench your thirst it’s important to not drink too much. It can be counterproductive and negatively affect your performance. It is best to avoid drinking mouthfuls and only take a few sips occasionally. You can hydrate yourself effectively without running the risk of drinking too much.

To make sure you do not run yourself dry, you should consume around 600-900 ml of water, per hour, during a triathlon, in addition to other nutritional needs. Although triathlons will have water available in transition and on the run course, not all triathlons provide an aid station on the bike course. Make sure the water bottle(s) on your bike are full so you don’t run out of water.

Hydrating while cycling can be tricky if you’re not used to it. With a secure bottle cage and lots of practice, you’ll be able to master this skill in no time.

Nutrition Guide for Every Tri Distance

Besides the difference of length, short and long-distance triathlons are also different in the impact they have on athletes’ nutritional needs. Learning how to fuel appropriately can make a massive difference in the experience you will have during your training journey and on race day. Keep reading our nutrition guide with tips for every triathlon distance you can use while you train and compete for your next triathlon. With nutrition, it is super important to not try anything new on race day since you don’t know how your body will react to it.

Sprint and Quarter

These are shorter distances where, in many cases, athletes can race without having to consume additional fueling, besides water.

Carbohydrates are Your Friend

ROCTANE Energy Gels.GU Energy

GU is our go-to when it comes to energy gels

However, if you are consuming calories during these events where you are performing at a higher intensity, it is helpful if those calories come from carbohydrates, as they will be easier for your body to utilize. Recommendations range between 30 to 45 grams of simple carbohydrates per each hour you are racing. Here is where gels, chews, and sports drinks come in handy. For example, energy gels usually have about 23g of carbohydrates, while chews contain around 25g per 6 pieces. With sports drinks, it is essential to choose drinks that are not low in sugar, to get over 20g of carbohydrates per 12 oz. These recommendations also apply during high-intensity training sessions.

Pre-Race Nutrition

Another factor to take into consideration is what you eat before the race. With this, there is no single formula or a recommendation that fits everyone. It’s best to find what works for you. A general rule to follow is to eat things that are easy to digest, such as plain waffles or toast. We recommend avoiding more complex foods like oatmeal, as they might be harder for your body to process. However, what matters is that you are eating something that makes you feel good.

Half Distance

The half distance is an event where you will undoubtedly be consuming additional fuel. Longer distances focus more on endurance rather than speed, so your nutritional needs are going to be different.

Nutrition During the Race

Some people have no problem consuming only gels or chews during longer events. But it’s common for athletes racing for longer periods to eat more complex foods. While you should still aim for 30 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per hour, it’s beneficial to get those from other sources besides just simple sugars. Things like granola bars can be very helpful for providing sustained energy without the sugar rush. They allow a steady utilization of fuel since they contain a mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. This can also help reduce stomach discomfort.

It is crucial to pay attention to your electrolyte intake. Especially when racing in the heat, because high amounts of electrolytes are lost with of sweat. Consuming electrolyte drinks, such as Nuun, is the easiest way to prevent dehydration.

Training Nutrition Plan

Your Nutrition Guide for Every Triathlon Distance

The main nutritional difference between short and long-distance triathlon training is the number of calories needed per day. Regardless of what you’re training for, it is essential for you to focus on recovery. Especially if you are used to having multiple workouts within a 24-hour time frame. Make sure to have meals of snacks that contain carbohydrates and protein after your workouts. This will ensure that your body can replenish the nutrients lost during training. Examples for recovery meals can be as simple as chocolate milk, a PB&J or a turkey sandwich or some cheese and crackers. Fruit with your favorite nut butter is also a good alternative. This will help you recover better for your next training session, and help you avoid burnout or injuries in the long-term.

With the help of this triathlon nutrition guide, you’ll be ready to rock whatever distance you choose to complete on the Kerrville Tri course.

Sighting Tips for Open Water Swimming

Swimming in the correct direction during open water can be a challenge for most athletes. This is why learning the proper technique for sighting in open water is crucial during training. Here are a few tips for sighting that can help when you line up for your next event.

Plan Ahead

Look for buoys or landmarks to help you sight while on the swim course

Print out the swim course map and go to the swim start to look for landmarks to use while sighting. Ideally, you want to survey the area at the same time when the swim will occur. This will give you an idea of where the sun is hitting the swim course and if the glare will be an issue. 

Look for landmarks in the distance that are distinctive and easy to spot. Things like buildings, peaks of trees, or dips in the tree lines are great for spotting. Buoys can be hard to spot during the swim, and especially if you are slightly turned in the wrong direction, the significant landmarks provide an excellent alternative for sighting.

Come Up With a Game Plan

If the swim course runs parallel to the shores, use the shores to gauge if you are swimming in the correct direction. Look back towards the shore when you are taking a breath on your side while you are swimming. Also, use other swimmers to help you gauge if you are swimming in the correct direction. If you were swimming with a pack and suddenly found yourself swimming alone, popup and sight for landmarks or buoys to check if you are swimming in the right direction. 

Prep Your Gear

Keep your goggles clean and apply your favorite anti-fog spray inside the goggles before the event. A good, clean pair of tri goggles will allow you to see better and further down the swim course to spot the swim buoys and landmarks.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

Tips for Sighting in Open Water

Here are some tips from seasoned triathlete and High Five Events‘ Operations Manager, John Chung. “Practice swimming with your head up in the pool. Use the cool down set for practice, and establish a rhythm for when to take a stroke for sighting. I like to swim two normal stokes and a sight stroke, pull, pull, sight. To get your head elevated slightly above water, push down instead of pulling through during the catch. 

On your next open water swim practice, figure out which way you naturally curve to when you swim. For example, I tend to swim to my right, so if the buoys are on my left on a counter-clockwise swim course, I tend to swim away from the course. So for me, I need to look for buoys to my left when I sight during the swim. Sight 2 to 3 times to correct the direction in which you are swimming. First, locate the buoy or landmark you’ll use. Second, adjust your swimming direction to get back on course. Third, continue to sight as often as needed to make sure you are swimming towards the buoy or landmark.” 

Make it a point to practice sighting during the cool-down portion of your swim sessions to have this skill mastered for your next event! Happy swimming!

Why Creating a Relay Team is The Best Way to Tri

Just when you thought Kerrville Tri couldn’t get any more fun, now you can make it a team effort! Recruit friends, family, or co-workers and create your relay team for Kerrville Triathlon’s 10th-anniversary celebration this September 26-27! The 10th annual tri takes place in the heart of the Texas Hill Country, Kerrville, Texas, with scenic views guaranteed. Relay teams can consist of two or three individuals to help you divide and conquer your upcoming tri while having a blast in the process!  Check out a few reasons why relay teams are a great way to get into triathlon and why you should create a team for this year’s Smokin’ Good Tri. 

Try something new

Maybe you know about triathlon, maybe you’re new to the scene. Perhaps you’ve cheered and supported friends at their triathlons, but you’ve never participated in one. Creating a relay team is the best way to get introduced to the sport! Everyone experiences pre-race nerves, especially if it is your first time ever completing a tri! That’s why building a relay team of two or three will help take some of the pressure off so you can focus on the fun. Split the tri three ways, or if your team has two members, one person does the swim, while the other person does the bike and the run. Depending on your individual skill levels, this can be accomplished in any combination. Train with your team, experience the highs and the lows, and get a taste of your new favorite sport.

The more the merrierThe more the merrier when you create a relay team

You can always get one friend to tri along with you, but why do that when you can triple the fun?! A three-person relay team is triple the action so, get two friends or co-workers to create your relay team.  Here are a few ways to take your team spirit to the next level during your training!

  • Create a sweet team name
  • Make custom gear to show your team spirit during training
  • Start thinking about what your team will wear on race day
  • Come up with a team motto
  • Have fun with it!

What feel is your team going for? Will your team opt for funny costumes for laughs out on the course? Or some matching outfits to show your fellow triathletes your team means business! With so many choices, your team will love this. And it’s a great way to really get you excited to keep working towards your goal.

You could use the help

Injuries happen. No matter what lengths you go to to stay safe during training, sometimes they just happen. But are you going to let that stop you from achieving your fitness goals? Not so fast! An injury that may prevent you from swimming might not stop you from cycling or running. creating a relay team for Kerrville Tri to test your boundaries during your team training sessions is a great way to stay active while continuing to strengthen your muscles! Just be sure you’re comfortable and aren’t in pain when training.  You never know, cross-training might just help speed up your recovery!

Making memories at Kerrville Tri with your relay team membersMaking memories

Create a relay team that brings your buddies back together to make some unbeatable memories. Get the old high school/college crew together. Make it a family affair and create an all-sibling team, or give the ‘rents a challenge you know they won’t be able to refuse! Take on a new challenge with your run group and create a relay team as a way to expand your fitness routine. Whatever direction you go, make this something you won’t soon forget. Participating with loved ones by your side and cheering you on, creating a relay team will make your Kerrville Tri experience unlike any other. 

Push Your Limits

Triathlon is a fun way to push your body’s limits, but we know making time to train for three sports can be difficult on top of everything else life throws your way. If you have a tight schedule and know you won’t be able to properly train for multiple disciplines, focus on one or two disciplines to push your limits! Find someone who swims like a fish in the water. Add a member who gets speeding tickets on their bike for going too fast. Pick a runner whose feet seem to never touch the ground because of their speed. Assemble this super team and hold each other accountable to keep up with training! Before you know it, you’ll be ready to show up on race day ready to set some new records or even take home 1st place!

Whatever your reason for creating a relay team, there are two things left to do: build your team to divide and conquer Kerrville Tri and register!